colonize

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colonize

(kŏl′ə-nīz′)
v. colo·nized, colo·nizing, colo·nizes
v.tr.
1. To form or establish a colony or colonies in.
2. To migrate to and settle in; occupy as a colony.
3. To resettle or confine (persons) in or as if in a colony.
4. To subjugate (a population) to or as if to a colonial government.
v.intr.
1. To form or establish a colony.
2. To settle in a colony or colonies.

col′o·niz′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study has shown that alates fly to and colonize more in higher light intensity areas, while the dealates have an opposite behavior colonizing more in darker areas.
Of 74 colonizing strains that did not have the PVL locus, most (94.6%) had SCCmec IV, and only 1 (1.35%) had SCCmec [V.sub.T].
These statistics come as no surprise when considering that Jesuit and Oblate missionaries, day schools and residential schools-Roman Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian and United Church of Canada--played such a large role in the conversion of the Native peoples almost since the beginning days of the colonizing process.
Such a critical stance exposes not only divergences among colonized and colonizing groups, but also rarely-explored forms of domination, resistance and discipline that challenge boundaries of administrative as much as scholarly discourses.
(11.) See Megan Vaughn, Curing Their Ills: Colonial Power and African Illness (Stanford, 1991); David Arnold, Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth-Century India (Berkeley, 1993), and his more recent collection of essays, Warm Climates and Western Medicine: The Emergence of Tropical Medicine, 1500-1900 (Amsterdam, 1996); Leonore Manderson, Sickness and the State: Health and Illness in Colonial Malaya, 1870-1940 (New York, 1996); and Philip Curtin, Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa (New York, 1998).
Nott's writing often constructs a colonizing gaze so powerful that it easily travels into the heart of "dark" lands and enacts a panoptic dissection and ownership of entire nations:
Can the poet expiate the sins of her colonizing Dutch forefathers?
Would not "death and silence" in Kokoro be a relatively candid resolution to camouflage a frustrated colonizer compared with an alternative, e.g., the triumphant mood involved in the colonizing projects?
If colonizing populations face heterogeneous and unpredictable assemblages of pollinators, herbivores, and resources, then individual variation in flowering phenology may have strong but spatially and temporally variable reproductive consequences.
The central issue of her book is that Marlowe's concentration on the stranger in a foreign land is no accident but a reaction to the increasing obsession with remote places and strange peoples resulting from England's colonizing ventures.
To me, colonizing the continental shelf is no more far-fetched than the stupendous feat of reforesting upper North America.
The relationship also varies according to the colonizing power and to the different post-colonial realities, especially whether the island is now independent or still colonized.