colony

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colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Olive trees that have stood for the best part of a millennium will now be felled to make way for colonist homes.
The film "Sholler's Archive" is dedicated to the 200th anniversary of the resettlement of German colonists in Azerbaijan and was screened on the special order of Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev.
Part of the benefit of one with a colonist status is the automatic reduction of the life sentence to 30 years.
The Obama administration backed its commitment to achieving a peaceful settlement of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with a two-pronged approach: more vigorously reaffirming traditional US position that the colonies are illegal and represent obstacles to peace, coupled with public demands that the Israeli government stop all colonist activities.
Colonists perhaps longed for familiar things from home and the intimacy of extended family relationships.
The Times Colonist said it would be "beefing up content in our Tuesday edition and other editions and increasing the amount of local material on our website, www.timescolonist.com, to bring you breaking news online seven days a week."
The author examines the processes of primitive accumulation by which white colonists gradually extracted surplus product and labor from the Khoisan population (pp.
The first is the colonists' efforts to pass their religious traditions to their children.
Dean McMenamie's piece was in reaction to stories published in the Times Colonist, which quoted some parishioners as saying they were "shocked" at the recommendations and they would oppose plans to close their churches.
Excavations in the 17th-century fort at Jamestown, Va., have yielded the grave Of a high-ranking male colonist. Physical and historical evidence indicates that the man was one of the community's leaders, according to William Kelso, archaeology director of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities' Jamestown Rediscovery project.
The hammer price of the trophy, won at the time by Stalbridge Colonist after an epic battle with Arkle, was pounds 6,800.