colony

(redirected from colonies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to colonies: British colonies, 13 Colonies

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the shift in people socio-economic characteristics (financial conditions, per month income, preference) is also responsible for conversion of farmland to residential colonies [18].
The physiological trigger to produce nymphs and replacement reproductives from larvae in cases of orphaning, as previously described in mature Coptotermes colonies (Lenz & Runko 1993), is also true in incipient colonies (< 10 mo old), although rare.
We found that colonies affected by IBDS had a risk factor of 3.
In which part of Antarctica are most of the newly discovered colonies located?
It is a historical moment for more than 40 lakh residents who live in these unauthorised colonies," a buoyed Sheila told a press conference here, a day after the urban development ministry approved the regularisation.
Now, new work by a researcher at the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology and colleagues at the University of Copenhagen shows that in some cases, the colonies can be cooperative instead of combative.
The non-importation movement gained momentum as the colonies united in their vociferous opposition to English oppression.
The book's first two chapters discuss how most colonies tried to avoid choosing sides during the Civil War.
The rioters were mostly the children and grandchildren of immigrants from former French colonies.
Natives hired to oversee the colonies often ruled cruelly, and direct European control could be even worse: Congo's first ruler, Belgium's King Leopold II, boosted production at rubber plantations and mines by ordering managers to hack off the hands of laggard workers.
After 2 days of incubation, this material yielded nonhemolytic and nonpigmented, as well as yellow-pigmented, hemolytic colonies of variable size, which were gram-positive catalase-positive cocci, consistent with staphylococci.
Colonies in the American South and the West Indies also endured a stifled development due to Spanish control and European dominance.