colonial

(redirected from colonially)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

colonial

(kə-lō′nē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, possessing, or inhabiting a colony or colonies.
2. Living in, consisting of, or forming a colony: colonial organisms.

co·lo′ni·al·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Arab revolutions are breaking down the colonially induced barriers among the Arabs as the common enemy to all is being identified as Israel, supported by the US and all the corrupt regimes that dance to the American and Israeli tunes
Colonially based economic growth and preferential legal codes privileging non-Egyptians attracted large numbers of European and Levantine (the Egyptians call them Shawwam, meaning Christians and Jews from Greater Syria) merchants, investors, and adventurers, who settled in the city and sought their fortunes there.
Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are burrowing ground squirrels that live colonially in grassland habitats from southern Canada into northern Mexico.
At a colonially influenced Kenyan school, she discovered Western ideas, in the form of novels, "tales of freedom, adventure, of equality between girls and boys, trust and friendship.
Africa has more countries than any other continent, even more ethnic groups, and hundreds more languages than the main colonially acquired ones of English, French and Portuguese.
"I see this as politically motivated, and I therefore oppose it," said one Kyrenia resident, who added: "It is also colonially arrogant and badly timed, especially with peace talks going on at the moment between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots".
But in migratory and colonially breeding birds, for example, females have typically lost their songs.
The ruling NCP did not merely fail to 'think through' the colonially crafted divide, as Mamdani sees it, but it reinforced and exploited divisive ideas of race, identity and citizenship in order to manage patronage politics, as it has done elsewhere in Sudan.
"21st is the century of unity of the colonially divided nations.
In a context where, as Stewart remarks, colonially inflected reverence to Shakespeare coexisted with indifference, there must have seemed to be a number of reasons for establishing a Society which would honour Shakespeare by reading his plays.
To those who are colonially connected we would say, in all earnestness, suffer not your unwillingness to refuse, what seems a small request, to make you instrumental, perhaps, in breaking up homes and sending forth many to misery and disappointment; and to those who found their hopes upon other's influence, we say at once, that until you have learnt to put your whole confidence in your own good arm, your honest heart, and God's good Providence, remain at home.
Citizens of mostly Arab and Asian Islamic societies for their part seemed this year to be more humble in acknowledging their own need to take the initiative to reform themselves, and not only to wait for others - especially the US and fellow Western powers - to treat Arabs-Muslims more equitably, and less colonially.