colony

(redirected from colonialist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to colonialist: colonist, colonizers

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
they are made by heroes who fully committed to eradicate the colonialists forever from the blessed lands of Algeria.
A discussion about AIDS intervenes with a colonialist discourse at the end of Possessing the Secret of Joy where a young Olinkan man who is dying of AIDS mistakes Adam for a missionary father and asks him to hear his confession.
Thakkar is able to craft a precise review of Rulfo's fiction, carefully reviewing the manner in which the author's use of both centripetal and centrifugal irony allows for a veiled criticism of the post-Revolutionary discourse of both the Church and the state, and also revealing the vestiges of colonialist tradition in the reality of a continued focus on patriarchal authority within Mexican society.
* Does the narrative reinforce or undermine the colonialist ideology of superiority?
The destruction of Wellassa (one hundred thousand paddy fields) area in the Uva by the Britishers and carrying out a genocide of human massacre of all adult males above 16 years of age causing blood bath and uprooting all fruit bearing trees and destruction of cows and other household animals is one such example of inhuman activities carried out by the imperialist colonialists in Sri Lanka.
He tells him directly that he should "protect what needs protecting; this is what Mother would want" thus explicitly instructing him, in his mother's name, to fight against his oppression by the white colonialist regime.
These texts are interpreted through the conceptual lenses of paracolonialism, describing US relations with the West Indies as both colonialist and post-colonialist, and the creole complex, which concerns US attitudes towards the continuing commercial dependency on the British in the West Indies, the "parasitic" trading practices advocated by Hamilton in the West Indies as a counter to the strength of the British and French navies, and how the mercantile relationship with the West Indian plantation economies undermined claims of American exceptionalism.
"The European colonialist had set the rules" Nunez writes.
Bryce takes their propagandistic pictures of joyous Indian farmers and the architectural highlights of Lima and transfers them in reduced black-and-white drawings to cream paper left over from discontinued East German stocks: He refers to this process as "mimetic analysis." From this chronological stringing, though, a comprehensive context emerges that reveals the South American idyll as a colonialist construct.
This article examines how new, globally-inflected patterns of consumption among young people in the state of Kerala, India are configured in relation to a specifically postcolonial cultural politics of gender, class, and caste, rooted in the colonialist and nationalist projects.
Although this nation's governmental policy and rhetoric were often anticolonialist when directed towards the practices of other countries, the United States itself increasingly enacted its own colonialist practices in this time.
(13) Bringing to this view a contemporary psychoanalytic lens clarifies the play's implication in colonialist ideology.