colony

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Related to colonialist: colonist, colonizers

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

/col·o·ny/ (kol´ah-ne) a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

colony

[kol′ənē]
Etymology: L, colonia
1 (in bacteriology) a mass of microorganisms in a culture that originates from a single cell. Some kinds of colonies, according to different configurations, are smooth colonies, rough colonies, and dwarf colonies.
2 (in cell biology) a mass of cells in a culture or in certain experimental tissues, such as a spleen colony.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.

colony

a discrete group of organisms, as a single cluster of bacteria in a culture that was produced from a single starting bacterium.

colony-forming units
colonies of pluripotent stem cells located and quantified in the spleen. Colonies grown in vitro interact with erythropoietin to give rise to morphologically identifiable erythroid cells.
colony-stimulating factors
cytokines produced by lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes which stimulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Includes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
they are made by heroes who fully committed to eradicate the colonialists forever from the blessed lands of Algeria.
Johnson whom Alice Walker claims as her sister exemplifies a case of colonialist discourse.
Thakkar is able to craft a precise review of Rulfo's fiction, carefully reviewing the manner in which the author's use of both centripetal and centrifugal irony allows for a veiled criticism of the post-Revolutionary discourse of both the Church and the state, and also revealing the vestiges of colonialist tradition in the reality of a continued focus on patriarchal authority within Mexican society.
The result is either mimicry or hybridity on the part of the colonised, or resistance and rejection of the colonialist culture and belief systems.
He tells him directly that he should "protect what needs protecting; this is what Mother would want" thus explicitly instructing him, in his mother's name, to fight against his oppression by the white colonialist regime.
It is the early 1960s and a fledging independence movement is stirring, causing the nervous British colonialists who have made the island home to worry about the long-term prospects of their privileged status.
This article examines how new, globally-inflected patterns of consumption among young people in the state of Kerala, India are configured in relation to a specifically postcolonial cultural politics of gender, class, and caste, rooted in the colonialist and nationalist projects.
Although this nation's governmental policy and rhetoric were often anticolonialist when directed towards the practices of other countries, the United States itself increasingly enacted its own colonialist practices in this time.
13) Bringing to this view a contemporary psychoanalytic lens clarifies the play's implication in colonialist ideology.
But David Kunzle, a UCLA professor noted for earlier writings about art and social criticism, studies both of the early history of the "comic book" (1973) and murals of Nicaragua (1995), has written an impassioned study of one of the most martial epochs of European history, when the Dutch Republic was forged in the crucible of its own Dutch Revolt, amid the ongoing agonies of the Thirty Years' War, and mired in its own colonialist destiny with further wars with both England and France.
It's a carrot-and-stick policy - bribery here, pressure there - but I think the conscience of people all over the world has said 'no' to Washington's colonialist war policy," Mr.
With the rise of identity politics, 'postcolonial' historians have shifted away from imagining class and national unities in India's past and have started pointing to diversities, but many of these studies have a tendency to recuperate the older colonialist imaginings of India.