colloid

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Related to colloidal suspension: colloidal solution, Colloidal dispersion

colloid

 [kol´oid]
1. gluelike.
2. the translucent, yellowish, gelatinous substance resulting from colloid degeneration.
3. a chemical system composed of a continuous medium (the continuous phase) throughout which are distributed small particles, 1 to 1000 nm in size (the disperse phase), which do not settle out under the influence of gravity. Colloidal particles are not capable of passing through a semipermeable membrane, as in dialysis. Solutes that can pass through a semipermeable membrane are sometimes called crystalloids. adj., adj colloid´al.
dispersion colloid colloid (def. 3), particularly an unstable colloid system.
emulsion colloid lyophilic colloid
rarely, emulsion.
lyophilic colloid a stable colloid system in which the disperse phase is relatively liquid, usually comprising highly complex organic substances, such as glue or starch, which readily absorb solvent, swell, and distribute uniformly through the continuous phase.
lyophobic colloid an unstable colloid system in which the disperse phase particles tend to repel liquids, are easily precipitated, and cannot be redispersed with additional solvent.
stannous sulfur colloid a sulfur colloid containing stannous ions; complexed with technetium 99m it is used as a diagnostic aid (bone, liver, and spleen imaging).
suspension colloid lyophobic colloid.

col·loid

(kol'oyd),
1. Aggregates of atoms or molecules in a finely divided state (submicroscopic), dispersed in a gaseous, liquid, or solid medium, and resisting sedimentation, diffusion, and filtration, thus differing from precipitates.
See also: hydrocolloid.
2. Gluelike.
3. A translucent, yellowish, homogeneous material of the consistency of glue, less fluid than mucoid or mucinoid, found in the cells and tissues in a state of colloid degeneration. Synonym(s): colloidin
4. The stored secretion within follicles of the thyroid gland. For individual colloids not listed below, see the specific name.
[G. kolla, glue, + eidos, appearance]

colloid

(kŏl′oid′)
n.
1. Chemistry
a. A system in which finely divided particles, which are approximately 1 to 1,000 millimicrons in size, are dispersed within a continuous medium in a manner that prevents them from being filtered easily or settled rapidly.
b. The particulate matter so dispersed.
2. The gelatinous stored secretion of the thyroid gland, consisting mainly of thyroglobulin.
3. Gelatinous material resulting from degeneration in diseased tissue.
adj.
Of, relating to, containing, or having the nature of a colloid.

col·loi′dal (kə-loid′l, kŏ-) adj.
col·loi′dal·ly adv.

colloid

Chemistry
A liquid containing 1.0 mm to 1.0 nm microscopic and submicroscopic particles.

Physiology
The thyroglobulin-rich, homogeneous pale pink (by H&E stain) liquid which is secreted into the follicles by the thyroid cells

col·loid

(kol'oyd)
1. Aggregates of atoms or molecules in a finely divided state (submicroscopic), dispersed in a gaseous, liquid, or solid medium, and resisting sedimentation, diffusion, and filtration, thus differing from precipitates.
See also: hydrocolloid
2. Gluelike.
3. A translucent, yellowish, homogeneous material of the consistency of glue, less fluid than mucoid or mucinoid, found in the cells and tissues in a state of colloid degeneration.
Synonym(s): colloidin.
4. The stored secretion within follicles of the thyroid gland.
[G. kolla, glue, + eidos, appearance]

colloid

A substance in which particles are in suspension in a fluid medium. The particles are too small to settle by gravity or to be readily filtered. The colloid state lies between that of a solution and that of an emulsion.

colloid

a mixture of two substances which are immiscible (see MISCIBLE), but where the particles of one are too small to settle out, and so remain suspended indefinitely. Glue is a colloid of animal gelatin in water; the water is defined as the matrix and the gelatin as the inclusion. Colloid particles measure 1 x 10-4 to 1 x 10-6 mm in diameter, forming either a SOL or GEL structure which does not diffuse through cell membranes. Colloids are common in cells, where their large surfaces are important for chemical changes constantly in progress there.

col·loid

(kol'oyd)
Aggregates of atoms or molecules in a finely divided state, dispersed in a gaseous, liquid, or solid medium, and resisting sedimentation, diffusion, and filtration, thus differing from precipitates.
[G. kolla, glue, + eidos, appearance]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, given the complexity of the reaction frame that can be very sensitive to local production environment, we think that any assessment regarding this critical issue requires a dedicated prolonged observation of the colloidal suspension.
Kim, "Experimental studies on formation, spreading and drying of inkjet drop of colloidal suspensions," Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, vol.
Ruoff, Colloidal suspension of highly reduced grapheme oxide in a variety of organic solvent, Nano Lett., 9, 1593 (2009).
(6) In brief, the as-prepared Ti[O.sub.2] colloidal suspension was mixed with TEOS at a volume ratio of 40:1.
Therefore, the XRD result indicates that restoration of AC/ SBE-[beta]-CD-LDHs is formed when AC/SBE-[beta]-CD inclusion complex is placed in contact with colloidal suspension of the MgAl-N[O.sub.3]-LDHs in formamide.
The spin coating of a colloidal suspension onto a substrate can accelerate the evaporation of the solvent [37, 39].
A colloidal suspension of latex particles is maintained predominantly by electrostatic repulsion between highly charged surfaces [9,10].
All pigments are finely processed to wetout individual particles into colloidal suspension for high loadings (30% to 85% pigment), high letdown ratios, and maximum tinctorial strength.
All pigments are roll-milled to wet-out individual particles into colloidal suspension for high loadings (30% to 85% pigment), high letdown ratios, and maximum tinctorial strength.
The capabilities of inorganic coagulants apropos of treatment of difficult-to-treat colloidal suspensions is fostering its popularity by a considerable attempt.