collodion


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collodion

 [kŏ-lo´de-on]
a clear or slightly opalescent, highly flammable, syrupy liquid compounded of pyroxylin, ether, and alcohol, which dries to a transparent, tenacious film; used as a topical protectant, applied to the skin to close small wounds, abrasions, and cuts, to hold surgical dressings in place, and to keep medications in contact with the skin.
flexible collodion a preparation of camphor, castor oil, and collodion, used as a topical protectant.
salicylic acid collodion flexible collodion containing salicylic acid, used topically as a keratolytic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·lo·di·on

(ko-lō'dē-on),
A liquid made by dissolving pyroxylin or gun cotton in ether and alcohol; on evaporation it leaves a glossy contractile film; used as a protective for cuts or as a vehicle for the local application of medicinal substances.
Synonym(s): collodium
[Mod. L. collodium, fr. G. kolla, glue]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

collodion

(kə-lō′dē-ən)
n.
A highly flammable, colorless or yellowish syrupy solution of nitrocellulose, ether, and alcohol, used as an adhesive to close small wounds and hold surgical dressings, in topical medications, and for making photographic plates.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

col·lo·di·on

(ko-lō'dē-on)
A liquid made by dissolving pyroxylin or gun cotton in ether and alcohol; on evaporation it leaves a glossy contractile film; used as a protective for cuts or as a vehicle for the local application of medicinal substances.
[Mod. L. collodium, fr. G. kolla, glue]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

collodion

An inflammable, syrupy solution of pyroxylin in ether and alcohol, used as a surgical dressing or to hold dressings in place. When painted on the skin, collodion dries to form a flexible cellulose film.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"But I didn't want to move into the sea of digital photography and after a foray with a wet plate collodion I worked out it could form the basis of the RNLI project," he said.
Patients were seen on postoperative day 14 to have the Micropore tape and collodion glue removed.
Jack, who embarked on this project to get away from the high end digital printing for which he had made his name, says the wet collodion process "was a newfound facet of photography for me.
Sent there on assignment for the New York Times Magazine, Mann hauled her cameras and wet plate collodion darkroom to Knoxville and set about photographing bodies in various stages of decay.
It is called the wet collodion process and it was invented by an Englishman, Frederick Scott Archer, a butcher's son from Hertfordshire who as a young man was apprenticed to a London silversmith.
To make a wet collodion negative, the photographer first sensitized a glass plate with collodion (a substance to hold light-sensitive silver nitrate to the plate), then submerged the glass into a silver nitrate bath (modern day recipes call for about two minutes in the silver bath).
To observe starch particles and PVAc latex particles in the dispersion solution after grafting reaction, a drop of dispersion was placed on a copper grid coated with a collodion. It was then air-dried and observed by SEM.
The plastic newborns are scientifically known as collodion babies.
collodion "I did a lot of digital and lm work and then I just stumbled across the collodion process about three years ago," said Jonathan, 41.
Charcot, however, famously provoked hysterical symptoms in his patients, using hypnosis to prompt performances for awestruck audiences in his self-described "living pathological museum" (3) and requiring his patients to hold poses--at length--to be documented by Paul Regnard, one of his photographers, who "was working with wet collodion plates: slow to prepare, slow to exploit, slow to expose, slow to develop" (Didi-Huberman 87-88).
The Haas Dialyzer, which also used a collodion membrane, was built in a variety of models and sizes.
The process of tintype begins by pouring collodion (a flammable, syrupy solution of cellulose nitrate in ether and alcohol) onto a metal plate or sheet of glass, where it firms slightly and is then put it into a dark box filled with silver nitrate to sensitize the plate.