colligation


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Related to colligation: collocation

col·li·ga·tion

(kol'i-gā'shŭn),
1. A combination in which the components are distinguishable from one another.
2. The bringing of isolated events into a unified experience.
3. The formation of a covalent bond by means of two combining groups.
[L. cum, together, + ligo, to bind]
References in periodicals archive ?
Colligation. After scrutinizing the concordance it turned out that the collocates extracted are embedded in identifiable colligational patterns.
This is especially useful in the case of semantic Anglicisms like the ones selected here, given the impact they may have on the collocations and colligation patterns in which they are involved.
Sinclair (1999) proposes a method where 25 concordance lines are randomly selected and each line accounted for in terms of surface (collocations and colligations) and meaning patterns (see Sinclair, 2003).
He covers sizing up progress in lexicography and its application to the Greek New Testament, a method for applying corpus linguistics to Greek New Testament lexical semantics, making sense out of meaning, defining units of meaning, collocations and colligations, and semantic preference.
In the history of English there were some colligations of certain finite and nonfinite verbs, which Denison (1990: 139) calls "auxiliary verbs" or "modals", and "impersonal verbs", respectively.
Beneficiaries must create relation in international national and networked colligations with each other and its result must be a clear statement of human behavior principles in nature frame that is acceptable for publics.
Both types of evolution consist of immense and successive colligations of factors.
(4) Thus John Dunn, where he had just asserted that "[i]f a statement is considered in a fully open context, its meaning may be any lexically possible set of colligations of the uttered proposition.
Forster [1988] argues that Whewell's consilience of inductions, in the quantitative sciences at least, is the agreement of parameters (coefficients) values measured by independent inductions (colligations of facts).
Latter is an unbounded version of the operator colligations product first introduced by Brodskii and Livsic.