collision

(redirected from colliding)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Computers A garbled communication between 2 devices in a local area network (LAN) that results when both attempt to transmit data simultaneously; after colliding, each device waits for a period of time and retries; increased devices on a LAN increase the likelihood of collision
Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one foetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking
Public health Road traffic accident/motor vehicle accident
Radiation physics The interaction between 2 particles—e.g., photons, atomic nuclei, electrons—during which energy, momentum, and charge may be altered

collision

Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one fetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking, see there Public health Motor vehicle accident. See MVA.
References in periodicals archive ?
indicated that a region near the center of one of the colliding galaxies was producing stars at a furious rate.
Vogt drove north on Highway 33, then east on Highway 150, colliding with another motorist at Boardman Road and causing him to crash, according to officials.
Rahae helped prepare a report for Congress on the probability of objects from space colliding with Earth.
Since 1917, astronomers have observed six supernovas in NGC 6946, leading Blair to speculate that the current smashup could be the start of a much larger process in which a slew of colliding supernovas blows a giant network of bubbles within the galaxy (SN: 11/21/92, p.
Because they are most often produced in that initial contact between colliding nuclei, J/y particles end up moving through the remainder of the merged nuclear matter, or blob.
Instead, Richstone says, the gas must have come from a colliding galaxy.
But most asteroids pass by a planet one or more times before colliding with it.
In addition, Venus lies closer to the sun than the moon does, so a colliding projectile has a higher orbital velocity, enabling it to generate more heat and melt more material.
Now, a computer analysis of the orbits of a small sample of near-Earth asteroids suggests that more of them will sing their swan song by diving into the sun than by colliding with a planet or being ejected from the solar system.
The scientists developed this theory while working with computer simulations of two colliding continents.