collision

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Computers A garbled communication between 2 devices in a local area network (LAN) that results when both attempt to transmit data simultaneously; after colliding, each device waits for a period of time and retries; increased devices on a LAN increase the likelihood of collision
Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one foetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking
Public health Road traffic accident/motor vehicle accident
Radiation physics The interaction between 2 particles—e.g., photons, atomic nuclei, electrons—during which energy, momentum, and charge may be altered

collision

Obstetrics A mechanical obstruction to the birth of twins, such that the lay of one fetus impedes the engagement of the other; the most extreme collision is known as interlocking, see there Public health Motor vehicle accident. See MVA.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Nothing quite like the chaotic beauty of colliding galaxies.
Observations last year with the Very Large Array, a network of radio telescopes in Socorro, N.M., indicated that a region near the center of one of the colliding galaxies was producing stars at a furious rate.
Rahae helped prepare a report for Congress on the probability of objects from space colliding with Earth.
In one scenario, if energetic quarks collide at a fireball's edge, the quark heading away from the collision's center might get away while its partner bogs down in the soup of still agitated, colliding particles--the quark-gluon plasma.
Those results have made the idea of colliding black holes seem less realistic.
Astronomers have discovered a pair of colliding galaxies connected by a bridge of high-speed electrons and elongated magnetic fields.
This glow probably arises from electrons colliding with sulfur dioxide gas spewed by the volcanoes.
In contrast, electrons colliding with protons at much higher energies reveal that, in this range, gluons act much more like particles than strings (SN: 9/6/97, p.
Astronomers have for the first time caught supernova remnants in the act of colliding. Although observers had seen evidence of past interactions between these shells of gas and dust blown off by exploded stars, the new images offer a rare glimpse of them "actually pounding into each other," says William P.
Because they are most often produced in that initial contact between colliding nuclei, J/y particles end up moving through the remainder of the merged nuclear matter, or blob.