collective unconscious


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Related to collective unconscious: Carl Jung

unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

in jungian psychology, the combined memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past, the deeper layer of the unconscious, wherein reside archetypes. See: archetype (2).
See also: personal unconscious.

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.

collective unconscious

Etymology: L, colligere, to gather; AS, un, not; L, conscious, aware
(in analytic psychology) that portion of the unconscious common to all humans. Also called racial unconscious. See also analytic psychology.

collective unconscious

Psychiatry
A concept posited by Carl Gustav Jung regarding an inborn, symbol-rich psychological foundation common to humanity, which differs slightly according to the culture; he postulated that the collective unconsciousness reflected a group mindset, which would allow for telepathy.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

(kŏ-lek'tiv ŭn-kon'shŭs)
psychology The combined engrams or memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past in C.G. Jung's theory.

collective unconscious

An entity, deemed to be a kind of storehouse of ancestral memory, proposed by the Swiss psychiatrist and philosopher Karl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) to explain similarities in symbolism among disparate peoples.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full-bodied rose of the dream is now evident in the following Collective Unconscious Ancestral Memory chart.
the collective unconscious--the collective unconscious appears to consist of mythological motifs or primordial images, for which reason the myths of all nations are its real exponents.
Crucial above all are the concepts of the collective unconscious, the archetypes and what is usually translated as 'amplificatory interpretation' or simply 'amplification".
He argues that "one essential principal of archetypal criticism is that the individual and the universal forms of an image are identical" and with this statement recognizes the value of Jung's theory of the collective unconscious (133).
Empirical findings about the phenomenology of mind gained from Associative Experiment, has opened a new dimension of artificial intelligence research, allowing us to create a link between a collective unconscious level and a conscious Mind.
Summary: Do nations have psychological processes - even Freudian processes, such as collective egos that can be injured, and repressed guilt feelings that can well up from the collective unconscious - just as individuals do?
Exposing the blurring of boundaries between safety and danger in war zones, the collective unconscious is codified as an aesthetic practice relevant to knowledge production.
The result is a new affirmation--coming from an unlooked-for angle of vision--that Emerson's private ideas and his public actions are all of a piece, that the ideals of the collective unconscious (human wholeness, diversity, freedom) found their full expression first in Emerson's own life journey and subsequently in his public campaign against slavery and for freedom.
unscathed at the blank door of the collective unconscious He whispers to
Her past works, such as the wildly popular Woods for the Trees and Remote (performed with former partner Ed Purver), were skillful multimedia melanges staged in intimate environments, drawing from pop culture, fairy tales, trends in technology and the rubble of the collective unconscious.
For Jung, the unconscious comprises of both the personal unconscious (repressed material from everyday life) and the collective unconscious (archetypes) (Jung, 1960b: par.
Cliches of Jews and Others,' uses a dizzying array of objects and images to plumb our collective unconscious.