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collapse

 [kŏ-laps´]
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.
circulatory collapse shock (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·lapse

(kō-laps'),
1. A condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to the same causes.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure.
4. The failure of a physiologic system.
5. The falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure, for example, collapse of the lung.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Psychology A popular term for a complete mental breakdown
Public health An accident involving the loss of an industrial or domestic building or structure’s integrity
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

collapse

A state of extreme prostration and depression, with circulatory failure. See Volitional collapse.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. A condition of extreme prostration.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure or the failure of a physiologic system.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

collapse

An abrupt failure of health, strength or psychological fortitude. The term is used more by the laity than by the medical profession.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. Condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to same causes.
2. State of profound physical depression.
3. Failure of a physiologic system.
4. Falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The city council report states: "The collapse occurred without visible or audible warning to the occupants of the garage and was sudden.
about a garage collapse with an odor of gas at 315 South Main St.
To summarize, think of climate through time as a wiggly-bumpy horizontal line--like a steady-state (but not static!) economy--and a major phase transition as a big jump (or set of closely spaced jumps) akin to a stock market collapse. For the anomalously stable and familiar Holocene, the magnitude of change has been small but what about the future?
In Collapse, Diamond proves himself an enthusiastic apostle of Malthusianism.
The family believes the collapse of the wall was a result of work carried out by the Israeli Elad settlement group in an adjacent piece of land the settlers were able to get their hands on several years ago in order to build a playground for them.
Citing a Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology study, he said Koh Dach, an islet in the middle of the Mekong River, affected the flow of water, resulting in the collapse.
In Nepal in December at least 16 people are killed and 25 missing after a bridge crowded with religious pilgrims collapses in the west of the country.
President Uhuru Kenyatta set up the NBI and tasked it with auditing and demolishing all unsafe buildings and ensuring defective buildings were regularised because of the rampant collapses.
When will we ever work towards seeing our country truly develop?The dam, built within a coffee farm, released over 70 million litres of water when it collapsed on Wednesday night, washing away an entire village.The criticism over governments promise to inspect and implement measures to avert disaster by Kenyans could be well-founded considering that three years after the collapse of the seven-storey building in Huruma on January 4, 2015 president Uhuru Kenyatta ordered an audit report of all buildings in Nairobi and inMay 2016, the president again raised issue that the audit report continued to gather dust as its recommendations were yet to be implemented by City Hall and National Construction Authority.
Building collapses are common in India, where unscrupulous builders and officials often dodge regulations or overlook the need to renovate old structures.
Temperature is significant for dynamic characteristics of bubble collapse. It concludes that bubble collapses faster as the increase of temperature, but the jet flow becomes weaker the same time.
Incidents of building collapses are common in India and most especially during the monsoon season heavy lashing the Mumbai and other parts of the country.