collapse

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collapse

 [kŏ-laps´]
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.
circulatory collapse shock (def. 2).

col·lapse

(kō-laps'),
1. A condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to the same causes.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure.
4. The failure of a physiologic system.
5. The falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure, for example, collapse of the lung.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

/col·lapse/ (kah-laps´)
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse  shock (2).

collapse

[kəlaps′]
Etymology: L, collabi, to fall together
1
Usage notes: nontechnical.
a state of extreme depression or a condition of complete exhaustion caused by physical or psychosomatic problems.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by shock.
3 the abnormal sagging of an organ or the obliteration of its cavity.
Psychology A popular term for a complete mental breakdown
Public health An accident involving the loss of an industrial or domestic building or structure’s integrity

collapse

A state of extreme prostration and depression, with circulatory failure. See Volitional collapse.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. A condition of extreme prostration.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure or the failure of a physiologic system.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

An abrupt failure of health, strength or psychological fortitude. The term is used more by the laity than by the medical profession.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. Condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to same causes.
2. State of profound physical depression.
3. Failure of a physiologic system.
4. Falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse,

n a state of extreme prostration and depression with failure of circulation; abnormal falling in of the walls of any part or organ; with reference to a lung, an airless or fatal state of all or part of the lung.

collapse

1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse
shock; circulatory insufficiency without congestive heart failure.
lung collapse
References in periodicals archive ?
Collapse" coverage applies to the use of defective material or methods if the collapse occurs during the course of construction, and also to a collapse occurring after the construction is complete.
9 magnitude earthquake rocked San Francisco, causing a number of the region's structures to collapse.
Shin, "Lessons from serial tunnel collapses during construction of the Seoul subway line 5," Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, vol.
Nigeria, where only 40 million of its 160 million people have access to public power supply, has set up a panel to investigate the incessant power system collapse experienced in the country in the past five months.
There were no injuries from the collapse and the garage workers safely evacuated the area immediately after the incident.
about a garage collapse with an odor of gas at 315 South Main St.
Murrah Federal Building was destroyed by explosion of a truck bomb knocking out three columns at its base level which then triggered the progressive collapse of the whole building [3].
In 2005, we reported on the modern trend whereby collapse coverage was being expanded by the courts.
Naseem is facing two charges in a Health and Safety Executive prosecution relating to the collapse of Sunset Amusements at Southgate in Elland.
In the intermediate and longer term, infrastructural collapses may diminish the shackles of deepest deprivation.
If you look back at the Northridge Earthquake, we had no collapses on city-owned bridges.
The only question is whether they will become resolved in pleasant ways of our own choice, or in unpleasant ways not of our choice, such as warfare, genocide, starvation, disease epidemics, and collapses of societies.