collapse

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collapse

 [kŏ-laps´]
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.
circulatory collapse shock (def. 2).

col·lapse

(kō-laps'),
1. A condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to the same causes.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure.
4. The failure of a physiologic system.
5. The falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure, for example, collapse of the lung.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

/col·lapse/ (kah-laps´)
1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse  shock (2).

collapse

[kəlaps′]
Etymology: L, collabi, to fall together
1
Usage notes: nontechnical.
a state of extreme depression or a condition of complete exhaustion caused by physical or psychosomatic problems.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by shock.
3 the abnormal sagging of an organ or the obliteration of its cavity.
Psychology A popular term for a complete mental breakdown
Public health An accident involving the loss of an industrial or domestic building or structure’s integrity

collapse

A state of extreme prostration and depression, with circulatory failure. See Volitional collapse.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. A condition of extreme prostration.
2. A state of profound physical depression.
3. A falling together of the walls of a structure or the failure of a physiologic system.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse

An abrupt failure of health, strength or psychological fortitude. The term is used more by the laity than by the medical profession.

col·lapse

(kŏ-laps')
1. Condition of extreme prostration, similar or identical to hypovolemic shock and due to same causes.
2. State of profound physical depression.
3. Failure of a physiologic system.
4. Falling away of an organ from its surrounding structure.
[L. col-labor, pp. -lapsus, to fall together]

collapse,

n a state of extreme prostration and depression with failure of circulation; abnormal falling in of the walls of any part or organ; with reference to a lung, an airless or fatal state of all or part of the lung.

collapse

1. a state of extreme prostration and depression, with failure of circulation.
2. abnormal falling in of the walls of a part or organ.

circulatory collapse
shock; circulatory insufficiency without congestive heart failure.
lung collapse
References in periodicals archive ?
This case presents the question whether a property insurance policy covering collapse of a building due to 'hidden decay' applies to the unexpected failure of wooden roof trusses, with no evidence of rot.
amp;nbsp;The collapse was the first in the Thruway's 33-year history and the worst in the region, the (http://www.
Roof collapse of underground cavities is a practical problem in geotechnical engineering, which usually arises not only in shallow tunnels but also in deep-buried tunnels.
It adds: "The danger to public safety and the immediate risk of collapse to these properties is high and it is recommended that these remain unoccupied.
The cause of progressive collapse phenomena can be due to human-made hazards (blast or explosion, vehicle impact, fire, etc.
In 2005, we reported on the modern trend whereby collapse coverage was being expanded by the courts.
Naseem is facing two charges in a Health and Safety Executive prosecution relating to the collapse of Sunset Amusements at Southgate in Elland.
the camel may wobble or groan as the loading threshold approaches; however, when a single straw precipitates a spectacular collapse, everybody stands around with palms upward in stunned surprise
Caltrans also identified 1,235 bridges and overpasses maintained by cities and counties that were at high risk of collapse in a major earthquake that had not been reinforced.
It is not a question open for debate whether the collapses of past societies have modern parallels and offer any lessons to us," he declares.
Building collapses are common in Egypt, often caused by shoddy construction
After the thunderous collapses, rescuers found their walkie-talkies and cell phones almost worthless to reach people trapped in the debris.