collaborative reproduction

collaborative reproduction

A term of art referring to medically assisted reproduction in which a couple (or single person) conceives with help from a third party who does not expect to be involved in raising the child, but who agrees to genetically contribute to the conception process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Richards abre el camino de la reflexion proponiendo el termino de collaborative reproduction (reproduccion colaborativa) para explicar los procesos reproductivos que implican a mas de dos personas, para dejar paso a que otras autoras analicen las relaciones posibles entre los reproductive others.
As used in this article, ART is distinguished from "collaborative reproduction," which means assisted reproduction using gametes or embryos provided by third parties, and "surrogacy," in which a third party carries a child to term for others.
Kindregan, Jr., Taxing Parenthood: Federal Tax Law and Collaborative Reproduction, 24 AMER.
to be legally bound as the parent of a child resulting from assisted or collaborative reproduction") (emphasis added); see also Maria C.
Scott, alluding to Robertson's view that infertile couples have a right to engage in collaborative reproduction as the only means for obtaining a child, maintains that this argument is compelling only if the couple desires a child to rear.
Two other reports further illustrate the importance of screening people who participate in collaborative reproduction. In 1995, a medical investigation concluded that women who undergo donor insemination face a potentially serious threat of HIV infection unless donors are screened for HIV.(5) Although various professional groups and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommend such screening, the rate of compliance is unknown.
One as yet unresolved issue is whether children born through collaborative reproduction arrangements should have access to information on their biological parents to satisfy their psychological need to know more about their origins.
First, the "class critique" capitalizes upon the fear that collaborative reproduction could result in "a breeder class of poor, minority women whose reproductive capacity is exploited" by the rich and powerful (pp.
Applied to the problem of collaborative reproduction, for example, the property law model would ask who owns the product of reproductive efforts and what that ownership entails.(48) Of course, the property law model does not provide a determinate answer to these questions, because at least three distinct parties -- the two gamete contributors and the gestator -- possess tenable claims to "ownership" by virtue of property law theories, the former based upon their investment of genetic resources in the reproductive venture and the latter based upon her labor in gestating and delivering the child.
The family law model is equally incapable of providing precise answers to the problems posed by collaborative reproduction, however, because it remains unclear what should count in determining parenthood.
Currently, collaborative reproduction is a lengthy, arduous, and quite costly experience.
There are serious problems, however, with accepting a simple contract solution to the confusion of collaborative reproduction; it is both inadequate and perpetuates an ideologically dangerous model of the family.

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