Coleoptera

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Co·le·op·te·ra

(kō'lē-op'ter-ă),
An order of insects, the beetles, characterized by the possession of a pair of hard, horny wing covers overlying a pair of delicate membranous flying wings; it is the largest of the insect orders with the largest number of species of any animal or plant order.
[G. koleos, sheath + pteron, wing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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Fig. 114 Coleoptera . Generalised structure.

Coleoptera

an order of insects, including beetles and weevils. The forewing is thick, leathery and veinless, and is called an elytrum. When closed, elytra meet along the midline and protect the membranous hindwings, which fold forward. Some of the approximately 280 000 species of Coleoptera are wingless, however. There is a complete METAMORPHOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Hexamermis gracilis, a parasite of coleopterans, is different by having the male three rows of genital papillae with the ventrolateral divided in two rows, the external with 8 papillae and the internal with 4; the ventral row with 13 preanal papillae and 14 postanal.
The results show the importance of arthropods, mainly coleopterans, in the diet of both species in the Amazonian forest fragments (Malcolm 1997; Lambert et al.
2A), comprised 16 groups, of which coleopterans (80.4%), hemipterans (69.6%), larvae (39.10%), formicids (34.8%) and crickets (28.3%) were the most frequent.
kentucki from West Virginia (listed in order of importance) were ants, coleopterans, micro-gastropods, spiders, pseudoscorpions, collembolans, mites, and dipterans (Bailey, 1992).
Effects of mobility on daily attraction to light traps: comparison between lepidopteran and coleopteran communities.
.Hemipterans coleopterans dipterans and pulmonates emerged commonest and most recorded macro-invertebrates both from wheat and its associated weeds throughout the study period.
[15.] Wang G, Zhang J, Song F, Wu J, Feng S and D Huang Engineered Bacillus thuringiensis G033A with broad insecticidal activity against lepidopteran and coleopteran pests.
Homopterans (13.62%) and coleopterans (8.45%) also contributes importantly to frogs' diet (Table 1).
A series of gumfoot threads are attached to the ground in order to catch small terrestrial insects such as ants, small coleopterans, and even collembolans.