cold

(redirected from coldly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to coldly: coldness

cold

 [kold]
2. a relatively low temperature; the lack of heat. A total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular motion ceases. See also hypothermia and frostbite.
3. low in physiological activity.
4. low in radioactivity.
common cold see common cold.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cold

(kōld),
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
2. Popular term for a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the nasal mucous membrane, watery nasal rhinorrhea, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
3. Completely devoid of, or containing an insignificant amount of, a radioactive nuclide.
Synonym(s): frigid (1)

cold

psychrophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cold

(kōld)
adj. colder, coldest
1.
a. Having a low temperature: cold water.
b. Being at a temperature that is less than what is required or what is normal: cold oatmeal.
c. Chilled by refrigeration or ice: cold beer.
2.
a. Feeling no warmth; uncomfortably chilled: We were cold sitting by the drafty windows.
b. Appearing to be dead; unconscious: found him out cold on the floor.
c. Dead: was cold in his grave.
3.
a. Not affectionate or friendly; aloof: a cold person; a cold nod.
b. Exhibiting or feeling no enthusiasm: a cold audience; a cold response to the new play; a concert that left me cold.
c. Devoid of sexual desire; frigid.
n.
1.
a. Relative lack of warmth: Cold slows down chemical reactions.
b. The sensation resulting from lack of warmth; chill.
2. A condition of low air temperature; cold weather: went out into the cold and got a chill.
3. A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing. Also called common cold, coryza.

cold′ly adv.
cold′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cold

Common cold, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature notably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for a virus infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the mucosa, watery nasal discharge, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: rhinitis
Synonym(s): common cold, frigid (1) , upper respiratory infection, upper respiratory tract infection.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cold

An inflammation of the nose and throat lining caused by one of more than 200 different kinds of viruses. Infection is by touch rather than by droplet inhalation and virus access is often via the CONJUNCTIVA. The medical term is coryza.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for viral infection involving upper respiratory tract.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about cold

Q. what vitamins are recommended for treating cold? and what is the right amount of it ?

A. Actually, although studied in trials, vitamins C, E and zinc wasn't found to have a substantial effect either preventing or relieving the symptoms of common cold, so currently these vitamins can't be recommended for the treatment of common cold.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/commoncold.html

Q. I think I caught a cold :( My throat is sore, and I keep snivel all the time. Is there anything I can do to in order to relieve the bad feeling?

A. Go to a GOOD health food store and buy Oil of Oregano capsules; take one a day. Also get Source, "Welness Formula". Take as directed, 3, every 3 hours. Drink LOTS and LOTS of water! NO Dairy and no sugar! You'll be fine in a day! :)

Q. Do Antibiotics cure a cold? I have a cold and a runny nose, should I take Antibiotics?

A. Taking antbiotics when you only have a cold can harm your chances of the effectiveness of using antibiotics when you have a severe problem. Your body can build up an immunity to antibiotics so it is only recommended to take them when your immune system can't fight off the infections. Most of the time, a cold just needs to run it's course , so drinking plenty of fluids and resting can allow your body to rejuvinate and fight the cold. To help prevent colds and viruses, look for products that help to maintain a good immune system like vitamin C. Aloe juice is another good product for your immune system. When we deal with stress and don't get enough rest, we cause havoc on our immune system, so prevention can be the best thing to do. Wishing you well!

More discussions about cold
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than suggesting that leaders remain coldly logical, it may be far more valuable to understand what research uncovered about the source of these reactions and methods for managing them effectively.
I vehemently deny having anything in common with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, as she has bombed and killed innocent women, men, and children in Iraq and Serbia, and coldly admitted on national TV that the hundreds of thousands of Iraqi children who have died from the sanctions on Iraq are "worth it."
Early nineteenth-century economists enlivened public discourse with coldly rational predictions about the inevitability of poverty and the fate of the poor.
There is an additional appendix that includes selected translations of Maxims [Ricordi], thus providing insight into Guicciardini's often cynical and coldly realistic character which inspired the epithet-provoking C28 "particulare mio" Ricordo that accounted for many negative readings of the historian over the centuries.
The old-new neo-conservative economics coldly ignores the cultural consequences of its haste, and in spite of loads of evidence to the contrary, politicians still speak in the cliches of cuts, cuts, and more cuts.
Coldly received at the time, Maj grew in prestige among Czech poets and critics of the 20th century.
Aldrich Ames may have cruelly and coldly sentenced people to death for money.
Irish actor Micheal MacLiammoir is coldly calculating as lago, arguably the most villainous character in the Shakespeare repertoire, while Suzanne Cloutier is touching as the falsely accused Desdemona.
Sir," I said coldly, "no one but my doctor or my wife messes with my poulan.
Miles Coverdale, the narrator, is a coldly inquisitive observer; in revealing his knowledge of the other members of the community, he reveals himself.
And Maya coldly tells Jacob to leave her alone, leaving him gutted.
"I've made a lot of them," Silva coldly replies, before shooting the teenager dead.