cold stress


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cold stress

cold

1. an acute disease of the upper respiratory tract characterized by cough, sneezing, running at the eyes and nose and mild fever, similar to the common cold of humans, occurring in captive primates.
2. a relatively low temperature; the lack of heat. A total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular motion ceases. See also hypothermia.

cold acclimation
short-term adjustments to carbohydrate and fat metabolism in response to exposure to low environmental temperatures.
cold acclimatization
heat production is not increased, but heat loss is reduced by changes in haircoat and vascular supply to the skin.
cold applications
the primary effect of cold on the surface of the body is constriction of the blood vessels. Cold also causes contraction of the involuntary muscles of the skin. These actions result in a reduced blood supply to the skin and produce a marked pallor. If cold is prolonged there may be damage to the tissues because of the decreased blood supply.
The secondary effects of cold are the opposite of its primary action. There is increased cell activity, dilatation of the blood vessels, and increased sensitivity of the nerve endings.
cold barn
see cold housing (below).
cold cow syndrome
see shock.
cold-enrichment
a procedure that promotes growth of some bacteria during laboratory isolation. Suspensions of specimens are held at refrigerator temperatures for extended periods before being cultured. Recommended for recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from neural listeriosis and Yersinia spp.
cold exposure
cold hemagglutinin disease
see cold agglutinin disease.
cold housing
thin-walled, uninsulated barns with no central heating.
cold injury
includes hypothermia and frostbite.
cold-nosed
refers to a hound which is able to follow a cold (very old) scent.
cold receptors
receptors in the skin which are sensitive to low temperatures.
cold rooms
walk-in refrigerator; temperature used varies with material stored, e.g. meat needs 32°F to 45°F (0°C to 7°C), offal needs less than 28°F (−2°C).
cold-shoeing
fitting a horseshoe without heating it in a forge and shaping it exactly to the foot. See also shoeing.
cold shortening
shrinkage of meat when temperature is excessively low in early stages of chilling.
cold steel surgery
that using unheated cutting instruments; the normal surgical procedure in contrast to electrosurgery or cryosurgery.
cold storage
for meat to be stored for more than 72 hours the chilling temperature should be between 30°F and 23°F (−1 and −5°C) and the humidity less than 90%.
cold store taint
cut lean surfaces of chilled meat are covered with a brown slime and have a sour smell caused by growth of the bacteria Achromobacter spp.
cold stress
occurs at temperatures less than 50°F (10°C), varying with chill factor, wetness, protection from wind.
cold therapy
see cryosurgery, therapeutic hypothermia.
cold tray
the container used for immersion of instruments in a cold sterilization solution, usually with a rack that allows instruments to be lifted above the fluid level to drain before use.
cold water hemolytic anemia
see cold anemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The forecast results appear to be better for cold stress classes because of the broader spacing of the classes on the cold side of the scale.
Effects of housing system and cold stress on heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, fluctuating asymmetry, and tonic immobility duration of chickens.
Temporal expression of heat shock genes during cold stress and recovery from chill coma in adult Drosophila melanogaster.
Effects of cold stress on the messenger ribonucleic acid levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in hypothalami of broilers.
Table-1: Basal Blood Pressure (Before intervention) and effect of Cold Stress on Basal Blood Pressure with their Mean Value & Standard Deviation Blood Basal Blood Rise in BP due Subjects Pressure Pressure to Cold Stress Mean SD Mean SD All Hyper-reactors (20) Systolic 116.
They conclude that cold stress and the inability to acclimate to decreasing temperatures, rather than starvation, are key factors in winter mortality.
3Combined data reveals that vitamin C supplementation may have a favourable effect only under special circumstances such as use prior to intense physical activity or exposure to major cold stress.
NCTRF's focus is to establish design, construction, and material requirements for uniforms worn by enlisted personnel and officers, and to develop personal protective ensembles that protect against threats such as fire and steam, heat and cold stress, ballistic impact, water immersion, and chemical/biological agents.
Indeed, it is also understood that a general mechanism still unknown is involved in the regulation of Hsf1 activity during rewarming in response to cold stress in various species (11, 14).
Although fall preparation is best to get livestock through the stress of winter's cold, you need to have a basic understanding of livestock cold stress and why it's so important to protect animals during this time of year.
The volume opens with overview chapters on dehydration tolerance, salinity tolerance, cold stress acclimation, redox-dependent regulation and oxidative damage in plants subjected to abiotic stress, array platforms and bioinformatic tools for the analysis of plant transcriptome in response to stress, and metabolic engineering of glyoxalase pathways for enhancing stress tolerance in plants.