cold receptor

cold receptor

a sensory structure that responds particularly to cold and sometimes to pressure. Such receptors occur in the skin of vertebrates, and in humans are more abundant and occur more superficially than warm receptors. fibres from cold receptors are active between 10° and 40 °C, with a maximum firing frequency between 20° and 34 °C.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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Specific substances such as Menthol and Camphor are higher in percentage that is 2.6% and 4.73% respectively,1 they attenuate the excitability of nerve membranes and of the specific itch mediating C-fibers and A-fibers.2 Both substances act by attaching to the transient receptor potential (TRP) receptor, but the main mechanism of action by which topical menthol reduces pruritus is by attaching onto the cold receptor TRPM8 which then goes and reaches the A-delta fibers and hence giving a cooling sensation.2 While camphor attaches onto the warm receptor TRPV3.3 Furthermore, menthol also helps in providing general anaesthesia by being a positive modulator of GABA type a receptor.
Julius, "Identification of a cold receptor reveals a general role for TRP channels in thermosensation," Nature, vol.
Further studies should therefore be directed at exploring both hot and cold receptor expression in the healthy and inflamed tooth pulp, thus helping to further elucidate dental pain mechanisms and direct the development of targeted therapies.
Curiously, the new cold receptor is found on nerve cells that also sport a receptor for hot temperatures and capsaicin, the chemical that gives chilies and other foods their fiery kick.
"This is the first cold receptor," says Ardem Patapoutian of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif.
Cold showers have been shown to relieve depression symptoms due to the intense impact of cold receptors in the skin, which send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from the peripheral nerve endings to the brain.
This new technology, the company claims, stimulates the cold receptors in the mouth cavity rather than the taste receptors on the tongue.
He added that a potential mechanism to explain the increased risk of coronary events associated with decreasing temperature is the stimulation of cold receptors in the skin and therefore the sympathetic nervous system, leading to a rise in catecholamine levels.
Menthol puts the hot receptors to sleep and the cold receptors send out a lot more signals in comparison.
In the case of massage, the touch can stimulate pressure, heat, and cold receptors in the body, sending positive sensations through the nervous system to the brain.
Warmth and cold receptors are more sensitive to changes in skin temperature than constant temperatures.