cold

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Related to cold exposure: hypothermia

cold

 [kold]
2. a relatively low temperature; the lack of heat. A total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular motion ceases. See also hypothermia and frostbite.
3. low in physiological activity.
4. low in radioactivity.
common cold see common cold.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cold

(kōld),
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
2. Popular term for a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the nasal mucous membrane, watery nasal rhinorrhea, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: acute rhinitis, coryza.
3. Completely devoid of, or containing an insignificant amount of, a radioactive nuclide.
Synonym(s): frigid (1)

cold

psychrophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cold

(kōld)
adj. colder, coldest
1.
a. Having a low temperature: cold water.
b. Being at a temperature that is less than what is required or what is normal: cold oatmeal.
c. Chilled by refrigeration or ice: cold beer.
2.
a. Feeling no warmth; uncomfortably chilled: We were cold sitting by the drafty windows.
b. Appearing to be dead; unconscious: found him out cold on the floor.
c. Dead: was cold in his grave.
3.
a. Not affectionate or friendly; aloof: a cold person; a cold nod.
b. Exhibiting or feeling no enthusiasm: a cold audience; a cold response to the new play; a concert that left me cold.
c. Devoid of sexual desire; frigid.
n.
1.
a. Relative lack of warmth: Cold slows down chemical reactions.
b. The sensation resulting from lack of warmth; chill.
2. A condition of low air temperature; cold weather: went out into the cold and got a chill.
3. A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing. Also called common cold, coryza.

cold′ly adv.
cold′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cold

Common cold, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature notably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for a virus infection involving the upper respiratory tract and characterized by congestion of the mucosa, watery nasal discharge, and general malaise, with a duration of 3-5 days.
See also: rhinitis
Synonym(s): common cold, frigid (1) , upper respiratory infection, upper respiratory tract infection.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cold

An inflammation of the nose and throat lining caused by one of more than 200 different kinds of viruses. Infection is by touch rather than by droplet inhalation and virus access is often via the CONJUNCTIVA. The medical term is coryza.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cold

(kōld)
1. A low temperature; the sensation produced by a temperature noticeably below an accustomed norm or a comfortable level.
2. Popular term for viral infection involving upper respiratory tract.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about cold

Q. what vitamins are recommended for treating cold? and what is the right amount of it ?

A. Actually, although studied in trials, vitamins C, E and zinc wasn't found to have a substantial effect either preventing or relieving the symptoms of common cold, so currently these vitamins can't be recommended for the treatment of common cold.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/commoncold.html

Q. I think I caught a cold :( My throat is sore, and I keep snivel all the time. Is there anything I can do to in order to relieve the bad feeling?

A. Go to a GOOD health food store and buy Oil of Oregano capsules; take one a day. Also get Source, "Welness Formula". Take as directed, 3, every 3 hours. Drink LOTS and LOTS of water! NO Dairy and no sugar! You'll be fine in a day! :)

Q. Do Antibiotics cure a cold? I have a cold and a runny nose, should I take Antibiotics?

A. Taking antbiotics when you only have a cold can harm your chances of the effectiveness of using antibiotics when you have a severe problem. Your body can build up an immunity to antibiotics so it is only recommended to take them when your immune system can't fight off the infections. Most of the time, a cold just needs to run it's course , so drinking plenty of fluids and resting can allow your body to rejuvinate and fight the cold. To help prevent colds and viruses, look for products that help to maintain a good immune system like vitamin C. Aloe juice is another good product for your immune system. When we deal with stress and don't get enough rest, we cause havoc on our immune system, so prevention can be the best thing to do. Wishing you well!

More discussions about cold
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References in periodicals archive ?
There is strong evidence that fat cells can directly sense low temperature and activate thermogenesis [20]; cold-induced upregulation of the transcription factor Zfp516 induces the expression of UCP1 [44], and BAT metabolic activity increases very rapidly following cold exposure [45].
Therefore, generally the thermogenesis and substrate disposal of the BAT have been investigated with cold exposure concluding that BAT is a potential therapeutic target against obesity and diabetes.
Table III.- Effects of cold exposure and high-fat diet on body compositions, body fat mass and serum leptin levels in A.
Also, when wearing heavy clothing, cooling of the body will most likely not occur during the short exposure of a max test of 8 to 12 min and the only cold exposure will be via the inhaled air.
A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine in the late 1970s famously debunked the belief that the common cold is linked to cold exposure, but British cold researchers have maintained that there is a cold air connection to the common cold.
Autotomy during and immediately after freezing conditions increased in direct proportion to cold exposure and was generally higher in C.
I think of the firefighters, and the police departments and the EMT emergency crews who performed thousands of heroic acts in saving individuals from cold exposure and related risks.
Dan Davis, the county's medical examiner, determined Egan's official cause of death to be "hypothermia due to environmental cold exposure."
Wim added: "My belief is that cold exposure results in you feeling better, stronger, and prevents many diseases.
The connectors were found to be free from damage following cold exposure, and the insertion-loss measurements were all under 1dB.
A number of industries, type of commerce and occupations involve substantial cold exposure: