cohort


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Related to cohort: Cohort study, Cohort Analysis

cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]
References in periodicals archive ?
cohort and the next is the same as for a set of cohorts observed over the last full business cycle.
Definition and identification of cohorts. Birth cohort studies were included in the project if they a) collected data on at least one environmental contaminant exposure topic (air pollution, water contamination, pesticides, metals, persistent organic pollutants, other chemical pollutants, noise, radiations, and allergens and biological organisms); b) started enrollment of mothers into the cohort during pregnancy or at birth; c) included in their protocol at least one follow-up point after birth with direct contact with mothers and children; d) included at least 200 mother-child pairs (a low sample size limit was chosen so small studies with relevant exposure data or based in less well-covered regions were not excluded); and e) were based in a European country.
An exploratory single-agent cabozantinib cohort and exploratory single-agent atezolizumab cohort with patients with metastatic CRPC who have histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate after prior treatment with one NHT for CSPC or metastatic CRPC are being added.
The quality of life of the patients as measured by the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Score-39 (PDQ-39) Summary Index, improved 15 percent for the first cohort and 47 percent for the second cohort at six months post-transplantation.
Cognitive Assessments: ABO-102 continues to show evidence of stabilization or improvement in cognitive function at six months in Cohort 2 and one year in Cohort 1.
What outcomes are anticipated as a result of a school counselor leadership cohort program?
And while the researchers could only speculate about the reasons for the higher prevalence of arthritis seen in recent cohorts, it was possible there had been "unrecognized changes over time in environmental or biologic exposures."
Burge suggests that the main question characterizing cohort 3 is "will I find significance?" Some of the traits he discusses in this cohort include core identity issues, competency, and becoming a mentor or sage.
During 1995-2012, the ratio of new LT waitlist registrations to LT surgeries performed for HCV-infected persons in the birth cohort remained unchanged at 1.9:2.0 despite the aging of this birth cohort.
For the current study, known as the PROMISE trial, the investigators randomized 836 women into cohorts of 404 (progesterone therapy) and 432 (placebo).
Six of the prospective cohort studies found no association between soy intake and breast cancer risk; one study, comprising 4% of the total population, found a lower risk with higher soy intake (effect size=0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.73; an effect size of 0.2 is considered small, 0.6 medium, and 1.2 large).
To conduct the study, researchers tested the lung function of thousands of 11- to 15-yearold southern California children within three different cohorts and during three different time periods: 1994-1998, 1997-2001 and 2007-2011.