cohort


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Related to cohort: Cohort study, Cohort Analysis

cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

/co·hort/ (ko´hort)
1. in epidemiology, a group of individuals sharing a common characteristic and observed over time in the group.
2. a taxonomic category approximately equivalent to a division, order, or suborder in various systems of classification.

cohort

[kō′hôrt]
Etymology: L, cohortem, large group
(in statistics) a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as members of the same age or the same sex.

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.

cohort

defined population or group sharing a common factor
  • birth cohort group of children born at a similar time, and studied prospectively throughout life

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort,

n in statistics, a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as the same age or sex.
cohort study,
n a scientific study that focuses on a specific subpopulation, such as children born on a certain date in a specific environment.

cohort

in epidemiology a group of individuals who share a characteristic acquired at the same time. The term usually refers to a birth cohort, which contains animals born in a specified time period.

cohort studies
a prospective or follow-up, analytical, epidemiological study. The investigation identifies a group of animals which have the hypothesized cause and which are free of the disease of interest, and a comparison group of animals which are free of the hypothesized cause. Both groups, the cohorts, are followed over time to determine the incidence rates of the disease in question in each of the two groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to new faculty, I suspect many faculty from other cohorts may find this a helpful resource as they reflect on their own academic careers.
Earlier diagnosis and preemptive cure of HCV infection with highly effective and safe direct-acting antiviral drugs may delay or reduce the need for LT among persons in the birth cohort (5).
An earlier meta-analysis of 4 prospective cohort studies, 2 of which were not included above, also found reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence in groups with high vs low soy isoflavone intake (HR=0.
A recent study in the Lancet compared the cognitive and physical functioning of two cohorts of Danish nonagenarians, born 10 years apart.
We then describe our data and document within and across cohort research productivity patterns and changes.
In our first example, we define each cohort by a single year of birth and we keep, in every year, those individuals between a minimum and a maximum age.
We think of the demographic and the cohort effects in the LFP rates of different demographic groups as the determinants of the long-run labor force participation trend.
All told, the retirement behavior of the Early Boomer cohort looks similar, at least so far, to the behavior observed for members of older cohorts at comparable ages.
METHODS: Birth cohort studies were included if they a) collected data on at least one environmental exposure, b) started enrollment during pregnancy or at birth, c) included at least one follow-up point after birth, d) included at least 200 mother-child pairs, and e) were based in a European country.
Orchard reported that the 30-year mortality in cohort 1 was 35% compared with 12% in cohort 2, a statistically significant difference.
The main difference was that the patient's pain medication was discontinued in the fast track cohort after day one of the operation, whereas, in the traditional cohort, pain medication was discontinued on day two.
When the total number of firms in the economy or the number of firms in a given cohort becomes arbitrarily large, the T-stage Stackelberg equilibrium converges toward a competitive equilibrium.