cohesion

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cohesion

 [ko-he´zhun]
the intermolecular attractive force causing various particles of a single material to unite. adj., adj cohe´sive.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn),
The attraction between molecules or masses that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn)
The attraction between molecules or masses that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cohesion

the attraction of identical molecules for each other.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

co·he·sion

(kō-hē'zhŭn)
The attraction between molecules that holds them together.
[L. co-haereo, pp. -haesus, to stick together]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Measuring Functional Cohesion, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 644-657.
Measuring the Coupling and Cohesion of an Object-Oriented Program Based on information Flow, In: Proc.
The cohesion and coupling of objects, Journal of Object-Oriented Programming, July-August.
Information Systems Decomposition Based on Cohesion and Coupling, In: Proc.
To say that social cohesion was embodied in a sense of social citizenship that distinguished the quality of Canadian life and community and contributed to a distinct Canadian identity, does not mean that it eradicated inequality, injustice and unrest.
Disenchantment with representation on the one hand, and regional polarization on the other, was most strongly expressed by the sudden demise of both the Progressive Conservative and New Democratic Parties, and the appearance on the federal scene of the western-based Reform Party, to the right of the Liberals, and the more social democratic Bloc Quebecois, Both of these new federal parties ran for the first time in 1993, with equally strong showings, signalling that long-standing regional cleavages in Canada might grow to be as serious a threat to social cohesion as the Quebec sovereignty movement.
Throughout the rest of Europe, as in Canada, these turbulent times have given rise to an obsession with social cohesion (Saint-Martin, 1999).
The identification of social cohesion as "an ongoing policy issue was made in 1996 by the department of Heritage Canada.
After consultation with policy researchers outside government, a PRI working document first defined social cohesion as "the ongoing process of developing a community of shared values, shared challenges and equal opportunity within Canada, based on a sense of trust, hope and reciprocity among all Canadians." This was a definition to come under considerable strain over the next few years, with the accumulation of independent (though federally-funded) research on the topic.
As research on Social Cohesion evolved, it became apparent that the related concepts of inclusion, exclusion, social capital and differentiation, are central debates in public policy and should be examined from a sociological point of view.
Inclusion, exclusion, work, education, poverty, social inequality and so on are not only at the heart of social cohesion, as the above citation acknowledges, but they are also the traditional objects of social policy, and central issues for social citizenship.
Social cohesion produces variable social outcomes, which in turn affect social cohesion.