cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
And while almost all the same sex families in 1996 had no children, there were 7,000 same sex cohabiting couples with dependent children last year.
Since 2008 the share of married couple families had declined from 69.1 per cent of all families while the share of cohabiting couple families has increased from 15.3 per cent to 17.9 per cent.
However, as most spiders take only a few minutes to copulate (Fahey & Elgar 1997), it is reasonable, barring the use of mating plugs or genital mutilation (reviewed in Huber 2005), to expect that cohabiting pairs have the opportunity to mate more than once.
Not all cohabiting couples will necessarily take up the right to register for a civil partnership Whereas pension rights for widows generally go back decades, rights for cohabiting partners might only start from the date the new legislation is introduced Some schemes already make provision for cohabiting partners to receive survivors benefits For all of these reasons, the true cost to schemes of the new legislation is likely to be well short of 25% of current liabilities in respect of future widows and widowers.
In 2007, the number of cohabiting adults ages 50 and older grew by 75 percent.
"For example, the family of a cohabiting couple could face an extra PS70,000 inheritance tax bill compared with the heirs of a married couple.
They will be covered by the old system - under which certain rights to an improved state pension after the death of a spouse do not apply to cohabiting couples.
Recent changes to intestacy law, which strengthened the position of those in marriages or civil partnerships, left the position of cohabiting couples unchanged.
Young couples gave high marks to their relationships regardless of whether they were married, cohabiting or dating, the researchers said.
Research by sociologist Elizabeth McClintock of Indiana's University of Notre Dame shows that, when married or cohabiting men are employed in heavily female occupations--such as teaching, childcare work, or nursing--they spend more time doing housework, compared to when they are employed in traditionally male jobs.
Cohabiting fathers exhibit higher levels of father involvement than married fathers.