cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Going by the term "selectivity thesis" that some researchers append to it, the cohabiters are generally a select group of individuals possessing characteristics that are not conducive to a stable relationship (DeMaris & Rao, 1992; Lillard, Brien & Linda, 1995; Budinski & Trovato, 2005).
However, one-fifth (21 per cent) of cohabiters report a separation of individual incomes, and a further 43 per cent have some separate and some combined income.
60) unmarried cohabiters are much more likely to be unfaithful to their
6%, 30% higher than sample 1 estimates, and of the same magnitude for cohabiters, indicating that married and cohabiting men earn the same wage premium--as long as they stay with their partners
Until the early 1970s separated and divorced men and women were the principal cohabiters.
Comparing data on 1,425 people married between 1964-80 when cohabitation was less common and between 1981-97 when it was more customary, they observed that, in both groups, cohabiters reported less happiness and more marital conflict than noncohabiters.
And if things do not work out cohabiters do not have the same legal rights or safeguards as a husband or wife.
And if things do not work out then the cohabiters do not have the same legal rights or safeguards as a husband and wife.
Friedman provides cogent analyses of the major doctrinal and institutional changes that have reshaped public and private law in America since 1900, including the rise and fall of substantive due process, the triumph of strict products liability, the end of federal common law, and even the extension of legal rights to cohabiters.
Those persons who stalked men tended to be strangers or acquaintances, rather than intimates, such as former spouses, former boy or girlfriends, or former cohabiters.
He asked: How many cohabiters have been divorced already before cohabiting?
Wives may be more inclined to provide both spousal pressure and spousal support for market work than cohabiters, who have less of a stake in their partner's career.