cohabit

(redirected from cohabitation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
While disapproving of cohabitation, Iranian law allows the traditional Shiite temporary marriage or "sigheh," under which a couple may legally contract a marriage lasting anywhere from a few minutes to 99 years.
The final chapter, "Marginalized Peoples and Creole Genesis: Societes de cohabitation and the Founder Principle" (by Faraclas and eight others), is a critique of the hypothesis that Founder populations determine the language evolution--an approach notably used by Chaudenson and Salikoko Mufwene to show that Reunionnais was inspired by French vernaculars, thus denying African agency.
Stylianides said that the government is preparing a bill on cohabitation and will amend the Criminal Code to criminalize homophobic rhetoric.
More than two thirds (67%) of people surveyed had never heard of cohabitation agreements, didn't realise they could protect the money they invested in a property, and didn't know how the equity of a property would be divided up if the relationship didn't work out.
While explaining the recent trend, Sociologist Susan Brown, the lead author of the analysis, said that the rising number of couples opting for cohabitation could be the reason.
We examined whether lower AChE activity from secondary pesticide exposure and cohabitation with a flower plantation worker (flower worker) were associated with changes in blood pressure and heart rate among children living in agricultural communities in Ecuador, where there is an active fresh-cut flower industry.
be continued in the regime of cohabitation too", Stefan Fule stressed.
Those studies about cohabitation are not disputed: Dozens more, from a variety of university and domestic-violence researchers, concur.
This will include, for example, the intention of the parties (either at the outset of their cohabitation or formed during their time together), and any contributions and improvements made by the non-owner to the property and over what period of time.
As nonmarital cohabitation has skyrocketed over the last several decades, courts and legislatures have increasingly struggled to decide what legal effect an ex-spouse's cohabitation with a new partner should have on the receipt of alimony payments.
And Strathclyde University economics professor Robert Wright warned: "It will make people rethink cohabitation.
For some, cohabitation may come with fewer unwanted obligations than marriage and allow for more flexibility, autonomy, and personal growth.