cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Similarly, if cohabitants split up, the legal mechanisms for sorting out the finances are less straightforward than the options available to spouses.
In a complementary way, the results show that women, tertiary education level, participation in training, divorced and cohabitant marital status are positively associated with a propensity for innovative self-concept, and in contrast, greater age, primary or lower level of education, married civil status and civil widowhood are negatively related to innovative self-perception.
During the last de cade, an awareness has been increasing of the potential problems that selection for antimicrobially resistant bacteria among companion animals may cause on human health, due to the increasing utilization of the same antimicrobial substances in human medicine and to the close contact between pets and their human cohabitants (Guardabassi, Loeber, & Jacobson, 2004; Guardabassi, Schwarz, & Lloyd, 2004; Moyaert, de Graef, Haesebrouck, & Decostere, 2006; Schwarz, Kehrenberg, & Walsh, 2001).
(154) Under Garlinger, if the alimony recipient is financially supported by her cohabitant or uses her alimony payments to support her cohabitant, a court may modify or terminate alimony.
Language among cohabitants can be opaque to outsiders.
(8) He referred to a number of research studies which highlighted the vulnerability of cohabitant relationships and the comparative legal disadvantages relative to the position of married couples.
The purpose of marriage, as a form of heavily obligated cohabitation, may well be to protect the economically weaker cohabitant from a form of exploitation that would reflect opportunistic behavior emanating from an asymmetry in the life cycle of men compared with women.
The Kyoto District Court sentenced a woman to six years in prison and her male cohabitant to five-and-a-half years for physically abusing and starving the man's 3-year-old son to death in Nagaokakyo, Kyoto Prefecture, in October.
He denied the magazine report that he had named his wife a cohabitant in papers for the apartment and said that the woman reported by the weekly as a cohabitant was his girlfriend and that he was in the process of divorcing his wife.
1st DCA 2003), (1) "Ii]or cohabitation to be sufficient to warrant a finding of changed circumstances, the court must consider whether either of two factors is present: whether the cohabitant provides support to the recipient spouse, or whether the recipient spouse contributes to the support of the cohabitant." The statutory requirements are similar, albeit with new catch phrases sprinkled about.
The results confirm that showering and bathing are important sources of THM exposure; they also provide evidence that other THM exposure scenarios, such as washing dishes by hand and being exposed to a cohabitant's shower steam, may also be important.