cohabit


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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
tendency to marry and cohabit within one's own educational group) or relative social distance (i.
It is also highly likely that people observing a rising divorce rate feel less inclined to marry, and cohabit instead.
Surely among America's eleven million cohabs there are thousands who cohabit because they consider marriage and the family obsolete.
While 41% of those cohabiting between interviews cohabit for less than one year, these individuals account for only 13% of the weighted total years cohabited.
There are a lot of examples of domestic violence between family members, and also between people who cohabit," Guo said.
But Raj Arnand, the lawyer who represented the four, cautioned that single women may still lose their benefits within three months of living with someone else because when the Court of Appeal struck down the ruling, the province responded by introducing a new rule, which allowed welfare recipients to cohabit with someone for three months before having their benefits reassessed.
Black and Hispanic children born to cohabiting parents who later marry face statistically similar odds of instability as children born to parents who continue to cohabit but don't marry.
Most likely those who cohabit as a "preparation" for marriage seem already to have the kind of family backgrounds that incline them to divorce.
Although cohabiting couples make up approximately nine percent of couples in Australia at any one time it is estimated that almost half of those below age 40 will cohabit at some stage in their life (ABS 1998a; Glezer 1991).
Popenoe and co-author Barbara Dafoe Whitehead even admit that as more young adults cohabit, the risk of divorce among those who've lived in sin is falling.
People aged between 25 and 34, many of whom live together before getting married, were the most likely to cohabit.
Previous to 1995, under the Bob Rae NDP regime, single parents could cohabit with an opposite-sex partner for three years and still collect full welfare benefits.