cognitive

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cog·ni·tive

(kog'ni-tiv),
Pertaining to cognition.

cognitive

(kŏg′nĭ-tĭv)
adj.
Of, characterized by, involving, or relating to cognition: "Thinking in terms of dualisms is common in our cognitive culture" (Key Reporter).

cog′ni·tive·ly adv.

cognitive

[kog′nitiv]
pertaining to the mental processes of comprehension, judgment, memory, and reasoning, as contrasted with emotional and volitional processes.

cognitive

adjective Referring to cognition, thought.

cog·ni·tive

(kog'ni-tiv)
Pertaining to cognition.

Cognitive

The ability (or lack of) to think, learn, and memorize.
Mentioned in: Vegetative State

cog·ni·tive

(kog'ni-tiv)
Pertaining to cognition.

cognitive (cog´nitiv),

adj/n pertaining to the mental processes of knowing, perceiving, or being aware; an expression of intellectual capacity.

Patient discussion about cognitive

Q. What is cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of depression? What is it all about? Please explain? Could someone who has actually had this explain what it is all about. I don't want to get a copy and paste answer from a web page somewhere, just a simple explanation in plain simple terms that I could relate to.

A. You mention "for example thoughts of worthlessness"

Could anyone identify other examples of these types of thoughts?

I struggle the most with guilt and shame.

Others:
What others think of me being a recovering alcoholic, someone who has depression, having a son who has been in a penitentiary several times.
---

What can anyone really do about these thoughts anyway. I have not come up with anything that works except to offer them all back up to God and let them all go.

What else could a professional come up that is any better than that? I would really like to know. Otherwise, what good would it really do?

More discussions about cognitive
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitively stimulating activity, particularly in early and midlife, is associated with lower brain deposition of the major protein constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease later in life, based on findings from a cross-sectional clinical study.
After adjustment for demographics, smoking, medical comorbidities, depression, social activity, and baseline cognition, moderate alcohol consumption conferred a 37% reduction in the risk of dementia in those who were cognitively normal at baseline.
These phrases are thought to be understood more easily by the cognitively intact elder than other types of VDSs.
And this allows for literacy to emerge and develop around cognitively focused opportunities that have their beginnings in linguistic knowledge.
Carotid sinus hypersensitivity [17] is more common in patients with fractured necks of femur (36%)--both cognitively impaired and cognitively normal than in patients admitted acutely for reasons other than falls (17%) or frail day-hospital attendees (13%) [18, 19].
The terms "very cognitively disabled people" and "very extensive cognitive disability" used throughout this paper are not intended to carry a technical meaning, such as a defined range of estimated I.
The Decision-Making scale is a cognitively loaded assessment of the individual's ability to use both insight and knowledge to make vocational plans and decisions, while the World-of-Work Information scale tests knowledge of occupations and careers, and job seeking and finding practices.
18]F]T807 binding in a group of 56 cognitively normal subjects with a mean age of 72 years.
Of these, 84% were cognitively normal and 16% had MC1.
The study was conducted over five years in a group of 102 diverse, cognitively normal people with an average age of 73.
Researchers at MGH have found evidence of long-term degenerative changes in the brains of older adults who are cognitively normal, but who show signs of the formation of amyloid plaques (clumps of toxic proteins that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
An examination of the association of antidiabetic treatment with rates of ICD9-CM-coded hypoglycemia in 497,900 veterans aged 65 years or older with diabetes showed that veterans who had cognitive impairment or dementia had significantly higher rates of hypoglycemia than did their cognitively intact peers in both adjusted and unadjusted analyses, the researchers reported.

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