cognitive-behavioral stress management

cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM),

n the combination of meditation with a variety of cognitive-behavorial strategies, such as problem solving and interpersonal communication, to recognize and alter responses to negative thoughts, often done in a group setting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Changes in mood and depressive symptoms and related change process during cognitive-behavioral stress management in HIV-infected men.
Women who participated in a group-based intervention called Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) experienced beneficial physiological and psychological changes, including alterations in the genes linked with breast cancer, according to a study published in the February 15, 2012 issue of Biological Psychiatry.
The present research attempts to study the effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) training in reducing the indicators of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment and job performance).
Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) training leads to the reduction of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the increase of the sense of personal accomplishment in women nurses.
Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) training leads to the lasting reduction of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the increase of the sense of personal accomplishment in women nurses in the one month follow-up.
Hypothesis 1- Cognitive-behavioral stress management training can reduce emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and increase personal accomplishment in women nurses.
Hypothesis 2: Cognitive-behavioral stress management training can lead to the long-term reduction of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and increased personal accomplishment in women nurses in the one-month follow-up.
The effectiveness of a school-based, cognitive-behavioral stress management program with adolescents reporting high and low levels of emotional arousal.
HIV-infected patients who participated in a 10-week cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention had significantly lower viral loads than those who did not, Jeffrey M, Greeson reported at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society.
In a randomized, controlled trial at the University of Miami, 54 HIV-positive patients were given a 10-week group course in cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) or a control course involving a brief psychoeducational seminar on the concepts of stress management and the importance of medication compliance.
Cognitive-behavioral stress management increases free testosterone and recreases psychological distress in HIVseropositive men.
Cognitive-behavioral stress management decreases dysphoric mood and herpes simplex virus-type 2 antibody titers in symptomatic HIV-seropositive gay men.
Full browser ?