cognitive science

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cognitive science

n.
The interdisciplinary study of the mind, intelligence, and learning, including research in psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and artificial intelligence.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cognitive science

The study of memory, information processing, algorithm use, hypothesis formation, and problem solving in human and computer systems.
See also: science
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
On the whole, Johnson's book is an excellent choice for any philosopher seeking to understand what it is like to navigate moral terrain with the eye of a cognitive scientist, or for any cognitive scientist wishing to apply his knowledge to pragmatist ethics.--Geoffrey S.
Cognitive Literary Studies: Current Themes and New Directions intends to demonstrate that "just as the study of mind is becoming an evocative new way to approach the problems of literary analysis, so too are literary studies becoming interesting and useful to scientists" (viii), which is clearly evidenced in the collaboration between literary scholars and cognitive scientists presented in this volume.
Nine tutorials provided methodological and in some cases hands-on introductions to state-of-the-art techniques, many of them aimed at facilitating the cross-field interaction of computer and cognitive scientists with the goal of improving modeling capabilities.
This has resulted in a curious alignment in the history of knowledge whereby literary critics and cognitive scientists seem to share the same terms of art.
"People say that dancing is an instinctive thing that we can just do without any training but I've been working with these cognitive scientists who suggest it comes from a much deeper place."
Yet different notions of 'module' might be used by different cognitive scientists; and massive modularity--the idea that the whole mind consists of a large number of substantially dissociated modules --is quite controversial, and clearly denied, e.g., by proponents of distributed connectionism.
Aside from the specific points Rubin and Birgisson address in Tangherlini's article, their critical discussion serves to highlight several places of substantial theoretical disjunction between the approaches of folklorists and those more familiar with the approaches of cognitive scientists. While contemporary folklorists have tended to conceptualize tradition and traditional memory as a set of tensions between the individual and the social, the works of psychologists and cognitive scientists, as well as scholars who follow their approaches, have tended to see tradition and memory more as the activity of individuals.
"Cognitive scientists with a linguistic orientation have achieved an influence in areas of public discourse that proponents of general semantics could benefit from studying.
opposes Descartes's mindbody dualism, he also opposes the materialist reduction of mind to neurophysiology that he finds in Antonio Damasio and many other cognitive scientists today.
Bandura (1977, 1997), among other cognitive scientists, posits that although we are born with "elemental reflexes and genetically influenced behavior potentialities" (p.
An interdisciplinary title, "Computational Intelligence & Neuroscience" is targeted to neuroscientists, cognitive scientists, engineers, psychologists, physicists and computer scientists and is designed to offer content that "bridges the gap" between neuroscience, engineering and artificial intelligence.
In addition to the many popular cognitive scientists who have extended the discipline's reach into the literary mind, like Steven Pinker or George Lakoff, we have begun to see an impact on current literature and also literary criticism.

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