cognitive sciences


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cognitive sciences

The areas of medicine that study the nature and processes of mental activity–eg, neurology, psychiatry, psychology
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to his work with AI researchers, Tenenbaum also spends a significant amount of his time working with cognitive scientists who are designing experiments to better understand the brain and mind, such as Laura Schulz, PhD, and Rebecca Saxe, PhD, both professors of cognitive science in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences department at MIT.
For a long time, the overarching goal of cognitive literary studies was fixed on importing the findings of cognitive sciences such as psychology, neuroscience, cognitive linguistics, anthropology, and philosophy of mind to enrich literary studies, in particular to enable literary scholars to comprehend processes of textual creation and reception, as well as textually evoked cognition.
According to Wheeler, "the embodied-embedded approach revolves around the thought that cognitive science needs to put cognition back in the brain, the brain back in the body, and the body back in the world" (idem).
The book addresses particularly the relationship between cognitive science and culture, politics, and religion.
Miller, "The Cognitive Revolution: A Historical Perspective," Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7, no.
Content focuses on the integration of robotics with information technology and cognitive science.
In the course of introducing readers to certain basic concerns of cognitive science, such as short- and long- term memory structures, segmentation, and structuration, he also offers explanations of basic art appreciation issues like boredom, improvisation, and listener variability.
Other authors have pointed out a similar contrast between cognitive science and cognitive sciences, e.g., Riviere 1991.
surveys the considerable literature in the cognitive sciences about the influence of biology and/or culture on the workings of the mind, the nature of consciousness, human freedom, religious experience, the uniqueness of humans, conceptions of God, and the future of the human species.
In the cognitive sciences, among other things, we have to enlist the help of traditional cognitive psychology in clarifying for us the multi-layered meaning of intelligence and its whole range of activities.
Blocking a common signaling messenger between cells might shut down the chronic pain and inflammation that plagues millions, says Lisa Teather, a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, who studies platelet-activating factor (PAF), a blood-clotting agent.
STEVEN PINKER HAS BEEN called "science's agent provocateur" by the Guardian, named an "evolutionary pop star" by The Washington Post, as a "wunderkind" by The Washington Post, and acclaimed by the London Times as both a "world-class cognitive psychologist" and a stud-muffin of science." Yet Pinker, a professor of psychology in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is more than a scientific superstar.

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