cognator

cognator

 [cog´na-ter]
in the adaptation model of nursing, one of two major internal processor subsystems (the other is the regulator subsystem) by which an individual adapts to or copes with internal and external environmental stimuli. The cognator subsystem encompasses psychosocial pathways and apparatus for perceptual and information processing, learning, judgment, and emotion. It is related primarily to the four adaptive modes of the adaptation model: physiologic needs, self-concept, role function, and interdependence.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a system, it responds to internal and external stimuli processed through coping subsystems called regulator and cognator. The ability to respond positively to environmental changes, as in this case due to aging, is a function of the level of adaptation of the human system influenced by the demands of the situation, and the person's internal resources.
The internal and external stimuli called focal, contextual, and residual stimuli activate coping processes, regulator and cognator which in turn, produce responses in the physiological, self-concept, role function, and interdependent modes.
The person mobilizes control processes which consist of regulator and cognator processes [34].
The regulator and cognator control processes were not measured in this study.
Components of the model include the coping processes of the regulator and cognator for the individual and the stabilizer and innovator for groups (Barone, Roy, & Frederickson, 2008).
Study aim I evaluated the extent to which age, gender, marital status, educational level, time post-injury, level and grade of injury, and time in rehabilitation and hardiness explain cognator coping processes.
Future research is needed analyzing other tenets of the RAM, such as cognator and regulator mechanisms.
An innate coping mechanism and a part of the cognator subsystem.
An acquired coping mechanism and a part of the cognator subsystem.
These systems act to maintain integrated life processes for the person and are known as the regulator and the cognator subsystems.
Verbal abuse incidents are processed by the regulator and cognator subsystems and will produce behaviors that reflect adaptation in this situation.
Mechanisms for coping involved both the regulator and cognator subsystems.