coffee

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Related to coffees: CoffeeScript
A beverage prepared from dried ground beans of Coffea arabica, an African evergreen; the berries are rich in caffeine, which stimulates the CNS and cardiorespiratory system and results in mild addictive symptoms.
Lifestyle Cardiovascular system 5 cups/day have been only anecdotally associated with increased CAD, arrhythmia, increased LDL-C, and apoB; the data is weak
Surgery Coffee may have a positive impact on symptomatic gallstone disease
Alternative medicine Except for enemas in Gerson therapy, alternative health ‘providers’ regard coffee in a negative light, as (1) its effects are abrupt in onset—which is not ‘natural’; (2) it is a psychoactive and addictive; and (3) per the homeopathic construct, it has an ‘antidoting’ effect, and may cancel the effects of homeopathic remedies—patients being treated by a homeopath may be required to abstain from coffee
Drug slang A regional term for LSD
Homeopathy See Coffea

coffee

Lifestyle A beverage made from dried, roasted beans of the coffee tree–Coffea arabica, a moderate stimulant causing mild physical dependence

coffee

A mildly stimulating drink made from the roasted and ground seeds or beans of one of several trees of the genus Coffea, which grows in East Asia and Africa. The active element is CAFFEINE and medical scientists have been arguing for years whether or not coffee, in moderation, is harmful.

Patient discussion about coffee

Q. How does coffee affect a diet? does it have an affect on metabolism? on losing weight?

A. Well, coffee can increase and to accelerate the beginning of burning fat during exercise (usually only after 20-30 minutes of exercise), but the overall effect is not that substantial. YOu should remember that it makes your kidney to produce more urine, so you should drink more.

Q. What is better for you tea or coffee? I like to drink both tea and coffee, but which is healthier for me and has less caffeine?

A. tea is much better than coffee because tea has antioxidants,which help the body,coffee does not and coffee has more caffine than tea.

Q. Is coffee so harmful? I am Saloni, 17 and a keen coffee-lover. Now-a-days, I drink lot of coffee which my brother has noticed and advised me to minimize the quantity. He also blames coffee for heart diseases and addiction status of the person. Is coffee so harmful?

A. The last response says "coffee is bad for you". This response gives no basis for its conclusion.

Coffee is served in hospitals. If coffee was really bad for you, then hospitals are doing bad things to patients and would have been sued for malpractice. A judge would laugh you right out of court for trying.

There are no FDA health warnings on coffee.

Coffee is served in restaurants everywhere in the world. Its everywhere in the work place. There aren't any rules concerning coffee.


More discussions about coffee
References in classic literature ?
I confess, I wanted the coffee badly; and I learned, not long afterward, that the berry was likewise a little weakness of Maud's.
"Wrote to YOU?" repeated Edna in amazement, stirring her coffee absently.
Having finished the paper, a second cup of coffee and a roll and butter, he got up, shaking the crumbs of the roll off his waistcoat; and, squaring his broad chest, he smiled joyously: not because there was anything particularly agreeable in his mind--the joyous smile was evoked by a good digestion.
This is what she does: sets sail for Pall Mall, wearing all her pretty things, including the blue feathers, and with such a sparkle of expectation on her face that I stir my coffee quite fiercely.
Sheepshead and croakers from American coffee, with real cream.
And here comes in the stout head waiter, puffing under a tray of hot viands--kidneys and a steak, transparent rashers and poached eggs, buttered toast and muffins, coffee and tea, all smoking hot.
About this time, if Grandfather had been correctly informed, our chair disappeared from the British Coffee House.
"Coffee and scientific researches," said Travers, grimly.
A few moments later, three steaming cups of coffee were served, and topped off a substantial breakfast, which was additionally seasoned by the jokes and repartees of the guests.
A waiter paused before their table and offered a salver on which were several cups of coffee and liqueur glasses.
"Have another cup of coffee, mademoiselle?" said Poirot solicitously.
James, as had been said, was in the habit of taking coffee with Mr Blatherwick in his study after seeing the boys into bed.