coevolution

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co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō'ev-ō-lū'shŭn),
The process whereby genes or gene fragments are changing together and not diverging.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coevolution

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coevolution

the evolution of unrelated organisms that has taken place together because of the special link between them, e.g. insects and the flowers they pollinate (see ENTOMOPHILY), parasites and their host, members of a symbiotic relationship (see SYMBIOSIS). The ARUM LILY is a notable example, attracting small flies.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper's detailed ethnographic data also document new sources of strategic inertia that may be the unintended consequence of coevolutionary lock-in.
As others have noted (e.g., Jermy 1976, 1984), these patterns can be explained by sequential colonization of related plant groups without the coevolutionary twist that the plants have escaped and radiated in the absence of butterfly feeding.
In particular, there is evidence for the coevolutionary reading of the balance of nature idea discussed above when he talks about the various organisms in the community (together with the abiotic environment) being bound together into a "seamless fabric" of relationships.
Wilson, Genes, Mind, and Culture: The Coevolutionary Process (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1981), pp.
The root-knot nematode resistance QTL may have been duplicated during evolution and their overall function conserved, yet moderated by coevolutionary processes of host pathogen interactions.
A challenge for coevolutionary studies is to determine whether traits that result in coordinated dispersal are a general and ancestral feature of associations thought to be strongly coadapted.
Or such aggressive behavior could be a genuine show-stopper in the coevolutionary arms race, a strategy against which there is no defense.
"What ifs" aside, many of the problems which plague general sociological theory are being solved in traditions with a different, Darwinian ancestry -- by a combination of biological, sociocultural, and gene-culture coevolutionary theory.
Casti, a faculty member of the Sante Fe Institute, wrote in his new book, Would-Be Worlds, of an economy existing "as a coevolutionary world, in which new predictors are constantly being created so that agents can get a temporary advantage on their cohorts.
My experience of what I see and hear around me is vastly enriched by being able to identify even a small bit of it in its native, coevolutionary tongue.
(1983), `The Family and the Firm: A Coevolutionary Perspective', Organisational Dynamics, 12, 1, pp58-70.
(1) humans have evolved within complex ecosystems rich in biodiversity and have an innate coevolutionary affinity with other life forms (the biophilia hypothesis);