coercion

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Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future, or the use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric—e.g., child psychiatry—or treatment of substance abuse

coercion

Public safety Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future or use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric–eg, child psychiatry, or treatment of substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
He goes as far as to argue that Marx's theory of ideology means that ideological conceptions conceal (only) the coerciveness of capitalism.
There are also substantial indications that reliance on confessions as strong indicators of guilt can lead to wrongful convictions where the accused turned out to be innocent, even when there is awareness of coerciveness or contradictory evidence.
Kominslcy-Crumb's work and Chute's readings of it address the coerciveness involved in sex, the psychic issues that attach to it, and the ways it can be depicted graphically in a form that is, by virtue of its resistance to aestheticization and verisimilitude, anti-pornographic.
Clinton plan, the new law is much too complicated, that it does far too little to rein in costs, and that the individual mandate is un-American in its almost socialist coerciveness. Furthermore, Obamacare does very little to end the crushing conflict between doctors and insurers and patients.
Holota, P.: 1997a, Coerciveness of the linear gravimetric boundary-value problem and a geometrical interpretation.
(13) The fourth limit--a restrained inquiry into the coerciveness and efficacy of the regulatory alternatives available to Congress--I articulate here.
Blum-Kulka politeness represents the interactional balance achieved between two needs: the need for pragmatic clarity and the need to avoid coerciveness. Thus, this balance seems to be achieved, in Blum-Kulka's opinion, in the case of conventional indirectness.
Themes of gender, race, religion, sexuality and ethnicity have been used to dispute the centrality of the idea of the nation in postcolonial literatures and to contest what these critics see as the coerciveness of the political desire for nationhood.
As Great Gram describes, both Corregidora and his wife exerted sexual claims over her, and the violence and coerciveness of these relationships is reproduced in the sexual or sexualized relationships between women that Jones depicts.
This is the same criticism that might be directed against America's Founding Fathers, but Botwinick says that Oakeshott's attempted solution--like theirs--is to essentially leave this to the private sphere so as to "minimize one major locus of coerciveness in society."
[...] EU policy makers have responded to critiques of the inflexibility and coerciveness of EU regulation by repeatedly promising to make EU governance simpler, more flexible, and less formal.
Various researchers have used directed-relationship items to measure familial justice and trust (Delsing, Oud, De Bruyn, & van Aken, 2003), relationship-specific anxiety (Cook, 2000), self-reported coerciveness (Cook, 1994), relationship-specific acquiescence (Cook, 1993), and emotional support (Branje, van Aken, & van Lieshout, 2002).