coercion

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Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future, or the use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric—e.g., child psychiatry—or treatment of substance abuse

coercion

Public safety Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future or use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric–eg, child psychiatry, or treatment of substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
[21] In our study, sexual coercion tended to involve older sexual partners, although among older girls, only 9% of coerced sex was reported to have taken place with a partner 4 years or more older.
This is one of very few prospective studies of sexual debut, and has collected data on both voluntary and coerced first sexual experience; it is the only study in SA that has collected prospective data from the preteen years.
This study found that coerced sexual debut among young adolescents occurred mostly through sexual intercourse with peers, older adolescents and young adults, rather than with older adults.
More research is needed to understand the processes that may link family context, school status and relationship experience to risk for coerced sex.
We focused on two dependent variables: coerced sex prior to Wave 1 and reported at that interview, and coerced sex during the period between waves and reported in the Wave 2 interview.
Where normally the service provider works for the client, coerced treatment changes the nature of that relationship by necessitating information sharing between the service provider and the referring agency (Day et al., 2004; Shearer, 2000, 2003; Wenzel, Longshore, Turner, & Ridgely, 2001).
A number of authors have commented on the confusion of roles for practitioners treating coerced clients (Day, et al., 2004; Honea-Boles & Griffin, 2001; Ross, Polaschek, & Ward, 2008; Shearer, 2000, 2003).
A new type of debt--which I have labeled "coerced debt"--is emerging from abusive relationships.
Coerced debt is a complex phenomenon with multiple facets and no easy solutions.
Coerced Confessions Will be More Completely Achieved
fourteen- year-old boy who was coerced by police to implicate Warner.
I joined the rally both times and NO ONE coerced me to do so.