coercion

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Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future, or the use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric—e.g., child psychiatry—or treatment of substance abuse

coercion

Public safety Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future or use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric–eg, child psychiatry, or treatment of substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
The organizational climate and specific power relations enable the perpetrator to take advantage of economic inequalities and professional disparities to coerce sex from subordinates.
In one, Taiwan will restrict trade only if it is politics-first; in the other, China will coerce only if it is politics-first.
The 25-year-old worker was confined for nearly three hours in J.S.' flat in Sharjah, according to records, and when they failed to coerce the father to waive his ownership, they handed him over to the Abu Dhabi authorities where he was wanted.
Dubai: A man claimed in court on Monday that his ex-wife had lodged a malicious complaint against him to coerce him to waive his children's custody lawsuit against her.
Why not mention Monsanto's abuse of political influence to coerce other nations into adopting bio-engineering technology or face sanctions as a result?
The 7th Circuit panel, however, found that the Wisconsin correctional authorities did not require or coerce offenders to enter Faith Works, but merely provided the offender with the choice of several halfway houses, most of which are secular.
"The Fifth Amendment says the state can't coerce a confession," he explains.
Even a disclaimer, said the unanimous court, would not "change the fact that proselytizing amounts to a religious practice that the school district may not coerce other students to participate in, even while looking the other way."
Making a Mobius strip out of paper is one thing, but now a team of Japanese researchers has found a way to coerce a single crystal into the same shape.
But apparently we're not meant to turn around the reviewer's last sentence so that it reads: "To increase the human power to coerce others is therefore to increase the human capacity for evil; to rein in evil might require reining in the extent to which people can coerce others."
Nor does the policy mitigate the influences that coerce audience members to participate in prayers offered at graduation."
Vos, a physical chemist at the Carnegie institution of Washington (D.C.), and his colleagues have used very high pressures to coerce room-temperature helium to combine with nitrogen.