coenzyme A


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coenzyme

 [ko-en´zīm]
an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, sometimes separable from the enzyme protein; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).
coenzyme A a coenzyme essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme Q any of a group of related quinones occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure and function to vitamin K1.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·en·zyme A (CoA),

(kō-en'zīm),
A coenzyme containing pantothenic acid, adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-pyrophosphate, and cysteamine; involved in the transfer of acyl groups, notably in transacetylations.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coenzyme A

n. Abbr. CoA
A coenzyme present in all living cells that transfers acetyl or acyl groups in metabolic reactions and that regulates gene expression through acetylation of histones.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·en·zyme A

(CoA) (kō-en'zīm)
A coenzyme containing pantothenic acid, adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-pyrophosphate, and cysteamine; involved in the transfer of acyl groups, notably in transacetylations.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

coenzyme A

see ACETYLCOENZYME A.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Coenzyme A looks like a prebiotic type of molecule because it seems to have formed from assorted building blocks, such as nucleotides and amino acids," says James P.
This work paralleled the work done the year before by Bloch, who used carbon-14 as a tracer to work out the way coenzyme A was involved with cholesterol synthesis.