coenzyme


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coenzyme

 [ko-en´zīm]
an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, sometimes separable from the enzyme protein; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).
coenzyme A a coenzyme essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme Q any of a group of related quinones occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure and function to vitamin K1.

co·en·zyme (Co),

(kō-en'zīm),
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves, are dialyzable and relatively heat-stable, and are usually easily dissociable from the protein portion of the enzyme; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.
Synonym(s): cofactor (1)

coenzyme

/co·en·zyme/ (ko-en´zīm) an organic nonprotein molecule, frequently a phosphorylated derivative of a water-soluble vitamin, that binds with the protein molecule (apoenzyme) to form the active enzyme (holoenzyme).
coenzyme A  a coenzyme containing among its constituents pantothenic acid and a terminal thiol group that forms high-energy thioester linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); these thioesters play a central role in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the transfer of acetyl groups, and the oxidation of fatty acids. Abbreviated CoA and CoA-SH.
coenzyme Q , coenzyme Q10 ubiquinone.

coenzyme

(kō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An organic substance that reversibly combines with a specific protein, the apoenzyme, and with a substrate to form an active enzyme system.

co′en·zy·mat′ic (-zə-măt′ĭk) adj.
co·en′zy·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

coenzyme

[kō·en′zīm]
Etymology: L, cum, together with, en, in, zyme, ferment
a nonprotein substance that combines with an apoenzyme to form a complete enzyme or holoenzyme. Coenzymes include some of the vitamins, such as B1 and B2, and have smaller molecules than enzymes. Coenzymes are dialyzable and heat-stable and usually dissociate readily from the protein portions of the enzymes with which they combine. See also acetylcoenzyme A.

co·en·zyme

(kō-en'zīm)
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.
Synonym(s): cofactor (1) .

coenzyme

an organic COFACTOR molecule smaller than protein that bonds with a specific ENZYME while the reaction is being catalysed. Like enzymes, coenzymes are not altered or used up in the reaction and can be used many times, but a minimal quantity is required for normal level of enzyme function and thus normal health. This explains why VITAMINS, which often act as coenzymes, are so essential. See also ACETYLCOENZYME A.

Coenzyme

A substance needed by enzymes to produce many of the reactions in energy and protein metabolism in the body.
Mentioned in: Beriberi

coenzyme

substance enhancing or necessary for enzyme action, not part of the enzyme

coenzyme,

n an essential nonprotein component (such as a vitamin or a mineral) of an enzyme.

co·en·zyme

(kō-en'zīm)
A substance (excluding solo metal ions) that enhances or is necessary for the action of enzymes; coenzymes are of smaller molecular size than the enzymes themselves; several vitamins are coenzyme precursors.

coenzyme (kōen´zīm),

n a nonprotein substance, such as a B-complex vitamin, that combines with enzymes to assist in the catabolic process.

coenzyme

an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, often separable from the enzyme protein but essential as a cosubstrate in catalysis; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).

coenzyme A
essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms thioester linkages with various acids, e.g. acetic acid (acetyl-CoA) and fatty acids (acyl-CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme A acetoacetyl
coenzyme A acetyl
coenzyme Q
any of a group of related quinones with isoprenoid units in the side chains (the ubiquinones), occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure to vitamin K1.
coenzyme R
see biotin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coenzyme Q10 ameliorates the reduction in GLUT4 transporter expression induced by simvastatin in 3T3L1 adipocytes.
Ercan P, Nehir ES, 2010, "The importance and bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10 in terms of nutrition and health", Tubav Science J.
Keywords: Coenzyme Q10, Diabetes mellitus, Blood glucose, Oxidative stress, Inflammation.
Coenzyme Q10 can enhance the DNA repair rate of affected cells and thereby improve long-term prognosis (Migliore et al.
2012): Olive oil supplemented with Coenzyme Q10: Effect on plasma and lipoprotein oxidative status.
Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like substance, a powerful antioxidant and moisturiser which works by speeding up cell repair.
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 in isolated systolic hypertension (Southern Medical Journal, Nov 2001): Twice daily administration of 60 mg of oral CoQ-10 was given to 46 men and 37 women with isolated systolic hypertension in a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
The global market for coenzyme Q10 reached a crest in 2004 and 2005, with demand outstripping supply worldwide.
Promising data with coenzyme Q10 shows that we might be able to support mitochondrial health to help prevent Parkinson's disease.
Coenzyme Q10 is found in all tissues and has two main functions within the body, namely energy production and as an antioxidant.
Through a review of literature, we selected Coenzyme Q10 due to its therapeutic effects on periodontal disease.