coefficient of thermal expansion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

coefficient of thermal expansion

The change in the dimensions of a material when its temperature is raised 1°C. In dentistry, if the relative expansion and contraction of restorative materials, casts, or appliances are not accounted for, the patient may have problems with improper fitting, microleakage, or adhesive debonding.
See also: coefficient
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The anomaly of the bulk coefficient of thermal expansion at the transition from the cubic to the tetragonal phase was found to remain distinct enough while its intensity is decreasing with the decrease of x.
* steel with the tangent modulus of elasticity E = 210 GPa, Poisson's ratio v = 0.25, the coefficient of thermal expansion a = 0.000012, the unit weight [lambda] = 78 kN/[m.sup.3]
The thermal and stress analysis confirmed that the cracks occurred as a result of different coefficient of thermal expansion of polypropylene matrix and the steel insert.
When compared to steel balls, silicon nitride provides a 40% reduction in weight, up to twice the material hardness for tight tolerances with a 70% lower coefficient of thermal expansion. Operating temperature ranges up to 1800[degrees]F.
The new test method, which includes new testing equipment, was recently approved by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as test number TP60-00, "Standard Test Method for the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete." It is included in the 2000 edition of the AASHTO Provisional Standards.
The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) have approved the method as test number TP6O-00, "Standard Test Method for the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete." It is included in the 2000 edition of AASHTO Provisional Standards.
The tooling material's coefficient of thermal expansion (CFE) is now a primary consideration.
This material, by its exceptional flexibility, allows the assembly of substrates having very different CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) over a wide temperature range (-45 [degrees]C to 220[degrees]C).
Set the thickness of Si to 50 [micro]m, Young's modulus to [E.sub.1] = 1.66 x [10.sup.11] Pa, Poisson's ratio to [[mu].sub.1] = 0.29, and the coefficient of thermal expansion to [[alpha].sub.1] = 2.6 x [10.sup.- 6][K.sup.-1].
Additionally, the Fluoroloy[R] A90 polymer shows a low linear coefficient of thermal expansion that is a favorable benefit in high-temperature sealing applications.
While there are, as mentioned, applications of ABS glass-filled frames, Schweindl points out that (1) those frames don't save a whole lot of mass compared to the steel unit because of the need to have thick plastic sections in order to achieve the required rigidity and (2) the coefficient of thermal expansion is sufficiently different from that of the headliner material so that warpage and wrinkling occurs at about 100[degrees]C.
The relatively high Tg value of 160C in combination with a low Z-axis coefficient of thermal expansion of 22ppm/C (g) and 175ppm/C (>Tg) ensure that the 92ML materials survive lead free solder exposures and board reliability testing.

Full browser ?