friction

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Related to coefficient of friction: coefficient of kinetic friction

friction

 [frik´shun]
the act of rubbing.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn),
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

/fric·tion/ (frik´shun)
1. the act of rubbing.
2. massage using a circular or back-and-forth rubbing movement, used especially for massage of deep tissues.

friction

[frik′shən]
Etymology: L, fricare, to rub
1 the act of rubbing one object against another. See also attrition.
2 a type of massage in which deeper tissues are stroked or rubbed, usually through strong circular movements of the hand. See also massage.
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Friction massage

friction

A soft tissue massage technique, which entails the use of small circular pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumb pads and palms, with the intent of mobilising stiff joints and enhancing the circulation of blood to tendons and ligaments.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
3. A group of movements in massage intended to move superficial layers over deeper structures, to reach deeper tissues, or to create heat. Includes static, cross-fiber, with-fiber, and circular frictions.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction,

n massage technique that uses superficial tissue to engage deeper layers. Friction increases circulation and fibroblast activity.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

the act of rubbing.

friction coefficient
see friction coefficient.
friction injury
caused most commonly by automobile trauma in dogs and cats in which the animal has been dragged along the road or pavement, causing avulsion of tissue, from skin through to ligaments, tendons, muscles and bone. See also friction burn.
friction rub
sound heard on auscultation caused by rubbing together of two inflamed surfaces, e.g. pleuritic friction rub. See also pleural friction rub.
References in periodicals archive ?
Static coefficient of friction values for laminated strand lumber range from 0.
The average coefficient of friction is compared to the particular standard being used, such as 0.
Insufficient transfer of turning movement is nearly always due to too high a coefficient of friction on the mating threads.
Although this difference in mechanical properties could be of importance in some specific cases, in general it is possible to say that the value of coefficient of friction does not affects significantly the measured mechanical properties of the cold extruded alloy.
Friction modifiers are coatings that provide a controlled coefficient of friction at the contact point between the wheel tread and the top of the rail.
It will be referred to in this paper as the coefficient of dynamic friction or simply coefficient of friction.
A new self-adhesive liquid silicone rubber (LSR) that has a low coefficient of friction, Silpuran 6760/50, cures to form an elastomer with a low friction surface, a property which enables self-adhesive LSRs to be used in novel applications.
Thus, creating a bump on the road reduces at the same time the coefficient of friction between pneumatics and road surface.
A new proprietary technology reportedly can produce TPU resins having a very low coefficient of friction (COF) without any lubricants, waxes, or fillers that cause blooming or reduce transparency.
higher wet coefficient of friction (COF) coupled with better compression set for water valve seals;
Nitrex High Endurance Surface Enhancement, with a surface hardness of HRC-60, adds lubricity to press brake tooling and lowers the coefficient of friction as the steel slides over the shoulder of the V-opening on a die.

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