codependency

(redirected from codependents)
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codependency

 [ko″dĕ-pen´den-se]
a condition in which one person supports, either overtly or inadvertently, the addictive behavior of another.

codependency

(kō″dē-pĕn′dĕn-sē)
1. In psychology, unintentional or conscious reinforcement of another person's addictive or self-destructive behaviors.
2. In biology, symbiosis.
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With that, it's a great time to check out a program such as Al-Anon or Nar-Anon, Codependents Anonymous, Co-Sex Addicts Anonymous, Adult Children of Alcoholics or others.
Codependent Forevermore: The Invention of Self in a Twelve Step Group.
54) states, "Publishers report that 85% of the readership of codependent materials are women.
In addition, codependency was measured with two survey items concerning codependent relationships that were included to serve as indicators of actual codependent behaviors.
Go to any meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, Codependents Anonymous, Adult Children of Alcoholics, or Shoppers Anonymous and you will see roomfuls of women, sharing stories of defeat, shame, abuse, and despair that are very similar to the ones heard, three decades ago, in CR groups.
The initial, relatively simple idea was that people who deny their feelings, alter their identity, and invest a great amount of energy in the attempt to control an alcoholic, share the alcoholic's addiction; they are codependent with the alcoholic.
Melody Beattie's Beyond Codependency and Codependent No More were on The Times bestseller list for many months.
Even institutions that treat alcoholics and other addicts may become codependent, since codependents compulsively focus on the needs of others at the expense of their own.
Direct, unsentimental, and passionate, Melody Beattie's voice became that of a generation of people healing from damaged lives, relationships, and families in 1987 when her first book, Codependent No More, exploded onto America's self-help bookshelves.
The potentially harmful impact of growing up ha an ACOA home necessitates the investigation of the theory that college student ACOAs have higher rates of substance abuse, are more defensive, and are more codependent than are their non-ACOA peers.
The message was clear: if a majority of the world's population could be described as essentially codependent or dysfunctional, the global solution was simple and obvious: therapy for everyone in conjunction with the twelve steps.
Perhaps those perpetually analyzed, codependent, and confused Americans would eventually come to realize that our highest cultural ideal should not be finding oneself, but hearing and helping others.