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Related to coded: Codec, Hard coded

code

(kōd),
1. A set of rules, principles, or ethics.
2. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
3. Term used in hospitals to describe an emergency requiring situation-trained members of the staff, such as a cardiopulmonary resuscitation team, or the signal to summon such a team.
4. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information, for example, about diagnostic categories.
[L. codex, book]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

code

(kōd)
n.
1. Genetics The genetic code.
2. Medicine Code blue.
3. Slang A patient whose heart has stopped beating, as in cardiac arrest.
v. coded, coding, codes
v.tr.
To assign a code to (something) for identification or classification: coded each response to the survey by age and gender.
v.intr.
1. Genetics
a. To specify the genetic code for an amino acid or a polypeptide: a gene that codes for an enzyme.
b. To specify the genetic code for a trait or characteristic: a gene that codes for red hair.
2. Slang To go into cardiac arrest.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Emergency care True code noun A widely used, highly popular term for
(1) A cardiopulmonary arrest or other emergency requiring resuscitation and a coordinated all-hands-on-deck response on the part of medical personnel
(2) A call for personnel over the hospital’s PA system to respond to such an emergency
verb To suffer a cardiac arrest in a hospital environment
Ethics A set of rules or principles
Genetics See Genetic code
Informatics The set of programmed instructions that tells a computer to do something
Managed care A system for classifying medical or surgical procedures for payment by third-party payers
Vox populi A system for organizing large amounts of information, in which each block of data is designated by an alphanumeric
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

code

noun Emergency care True code A widely used, highly popular term for
1. A cardiopulmonary arrest or other emergency requiring resuscitation, or.
2. A call for personnel over the hospital's PA system to respond to such an emergency. See Failed code, Slow code Ethics A set of rules or principles. See Code of Hammurabi, Nuremburg code, Hunter-killer code Managed care A system for classifying medical or surgical procedures for payment by third-party payers. See A code, Activity code, Barcode, -GB code, J code, K code, NBG code, Uniform billing code, V code Vox populi A system for organizing large amounts of information, in which each block of data is designated by an alphanumeric. See Barcode. verb To suffer a cardiac arrest in a hospital environment.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

code

(kōd)
1. A set of rules, principles, or ethics.
2. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
3. Term used in hospitals to describe an emergency situation requiring trained members of the staff, such as a cardiopulmonary resuscitation team, or the signal to summon such a team.
4. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information (e.g., about diagnostic categories).
5. To assign an alphanumeric combination to a diagnosis or procedure.
See also: NATO code
[L. codex, book]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

code

(kōd)
1. Any system devised to convey information or facilitate communication.
2. A numeric system for ordering and classifying information.
[L. codex, book]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Skin tears meet this definition because they "develop because of injury." If a skin tear is related to pressure, it should also be coded in M2.
Payment for any procedure coded without the base-year data continued to climb to 75 percent of the usual and customary charge.