cocoon

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cocoon

(kə-ko͞on′)
n.
a. A protective case of silk or similar fibrous material spun by the larvae of moths and certain other insects as a cover for the pupa.
b. A similar natural protective covering or structure, such as the egg case of a spider.
A descriptive term for the fibrotic encasement of the entire small intestine in sclerosing peritonitis, a spontaneous idiopathic process in young women, which follows peritoneovenous shunting, practolol therapy, peritoneal dialysis, chemotherapy, or in which other unknown toxins stimulate fibroblastic proliferation and reactive fibrosis
Treatment Surgical lysis of adhesions and constricting bands

cocoon

A descriptor for the fibrotic encasement of the entire small intestine in sclerosing peritonitis, a spontaneous idiopathic process in young ♀, which follows peritoneovenous shunting, practolol therapy, peritoneal dialysis, chemotherapy, where unknown toxins may stimulate fibroblastic proliferation, reactive fibrosis

cocoon

a protective covering of eggs or larvae found in several invertebrate groups. In some cases, e.g. ANNELIDS, a cocoon is produced by the adults to contain the eggs and in others, e.g. insects, by the larvae to protect the pupa during the course of development.
References in periodicals archive ?
fetida cocoons cannot tolerate freezing temperatures whereas the cocoons of many other European lumbricids (including Lumbricus rubellus) are frost tolerant (Holmstrup et al.
Maximum of larval growth and uniform cocoon production determined by mulberry leaves varieties and caused that long silk fiber in silkworm fed on foreign variety compared with local varieties [27].
Starting in 2003, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) proved that hermetic storage of paddy and rice seed using 5-ton Cocoons produced results equivalent to storing under air conditioning or refrigeration for periods of up to a year.
Thousands of caterpillars in the Netherlands spun a giant cocoon that coated everything nearby, including the car, trees, and even the street.
The cocoon has been crafted for Sean's needs by a company called Orthodocs and gives him protection against the everyday obstacles he faces at the Teesside Cheshire Home in Marske, where he has lived for ten years.
Unfortunately it is not easy to develop natural silk from wild worm cocoon as cocoon production depends on the season, dry and rainy seasons.
After finding some cocoons in various calibers, we headed out of Last Chance Canyon to explore some mines.
The harshest stage was when the slim fingers of young girls were dipped repeatedly into almost boiling water to catch the end of the silk thread from the cocoons.
From the works of 1966 (grouped under the title "Nostalgia of the Body" and to which Stone and Air, the pebble and plastic bag proposition alluded to above belongs) all the way through to the therapeutic work at the end of her life, two aspects of Clark's production become exceedingly important: the temporal dimension (her propositions required progressively more time to open up like cocoons and affect the participants) and the literal embodiment of the material props as what Melanie Klein called "part objects," the imagery of one's own body parts fleetingly summoned during the enactment of the proposition.
The age of connecting is about consumers emerging from their cocoons and reconnecting with the outside world.