cockatoo

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cockatoo

a group of birds in the family Psittacidae, characterized by a topknot of erectile feathers. Includes the Kakatoe and Microglossus genera. There are many species with different colors.

cockatoo beak and feather disease
see psittacine beak and feather disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the NBI-EnCD, they received information from an asset on March 12, about a major shipment of endangered cockatoos and other animals from Indonesia to be delivered to Bernales, prompting the NBI-EnCD and DENR-EMB to plan and execute the buy-bust operation.
They reported in the journal PLOS One that the cockatoos were not only able to match the shapes to the holes, but did much better than monkeys or chimpanzees.
There was much laughter when Cori Burns, 63, rolled into the studio on her scooter adorned with cockatoos after admitting her goal in life is to have a number one album of her own songs.
The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the pharmacokinetics after a single dose of orally administered amitriptyline in cockatoos (Cacatua species) and African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) to establish whether therapeutic intervals are feasible with the current dosing range.
A team of international Scientists tested eight Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffini), a conspicuously inquisitive and playful species on visible as well as invisible Piagetian object displacements and derivations of spatial transposition, rotation and translocation tasks.
Moluccan Cockatoos are social birds who can be extremely affectionate; however, they can develop behavioral problems if given too much attention, according to iTalk Bird Trainer.
The average lifespan of a cockatoo can be 70 to 80 years, but there have been some reported cases of cockatoos living to be over 100.
His love of books and the tree with the cockatoos is movingly shown and the ultimate end to the story is inevitable.
Filling the skies of Australia, cockatoos have long captured human imagination.
Tracking cockatoos using radio or satellite tracking presents a challenge to researchers, due to the difficulty of finding a transmitter that doesn't impair the birds' flight or survival, and that can withstand being nibbled by their very strong beaks.
The company has been plagued by cockatoos chewing through existing conduits between its phone booths and the solar panels that supply power to them.