cochlear hair cells

co·chle·ar hair cells

sensory cells in the spiral organ in synaptic contact with sensory as well as efferent fibers of the cochlear (auditory) nerve; from the apical end of each cell about 100 stereocilia extend from the surface and make contact with the tectorial membrane.
Synonym(s): Corti cells

co·chle·ar hair cells

(kok'lē-ăr hār selz)
Sensory cells in the organ of Corti in synaptic contact with sensory as well as efferent fibers of the cochlear auditory nerve; from the apical end of each cell, about 100 stereocilia extend from the surface and make contact with the tectorial membrane.
Synonym(s): Corti cells.

Corti,

Marquis Alfonso, Italian anatomist, 1822-1888.
Corti arch - the arch formed by the junction of the heads of Corti inner and outer pillar cells.
Corti auditory teeth - tooth-shaped formations or ridges occurring on the vestibular lip of the limbus lamina spiralis of the cochlear duct. Synonym(s): auditory teeth
Corti canal - Synonym(s): Corti tunnel
Corti cells - sensory cells in the organ of Corti in synaptic contact with sensory as well as efferent fibers of the cochlear (auditory) nerve. Synonym(s): cochlear hair cells
Corti ganglion - an elongated ganglion of bipolar sensory nerve cell bodies on the cochlear part of the vestibulocochlear nerve in the spiral canal of the modiolus. Synonym(s): spiral ganglion of cochlea
Corti membrane - a gelatinous membrane that overlies the spiral organ (Corti) in the inner ear. Synonym(s): tectorial membrane of cochlear duct
Corti organ - a prominent ridge of highly specialized epithelium in the floor of the cochlear duct. Synonym(s): spiral organ
Corti pillars - cells forming the outer and inner walls of the tunnel in the organ of Corti. Synonym(s): Corti rods; pillar cells; pillar cells of Corti
Corti rods - Synonym(s): Corti pillars
Corti tunnel - the spiral canal in the organ of Corti, filled with fluid and occasionally crossed by nonmedullated nerve fibers. Synonym(s): Corti canal
pillar cells of Corti - Synonym(s): Corti pillars
References in periodicals archive ?
Wavefront shaping through an ultrathin probe--around 400 micrometres in diameter--was used for diffraction limited focusing and digital scanning of the focus spot, and selective ablation of cochlear hair cells was performed based on images obtained through the same probe.
Lack of function within the cochlear hair cells leads to development of deafness.12 Similarly, CDH23, (OMIM: 605516) gene encoding Cadherin-23 showed mutation in both NSHL (DFNB12) and Usher syndrome type ID (USH1D).13 CDH23 contain 69 exons and codes 3,354-amino-acid protein comprising 27 cadherin extracellular (EC) repeats, a transmembrane domain and a unique cytoplasmic domain.
The cochlear hair cells are the only disrupted sites resulting from Tric KO as reported previously [10], despite the fact that the ES and scala media in the cochlea share a single endolymphatic space.
The cochlear hair cells are divided into two types: outer hair cells (OHCs) and inner hair cells (IHCs).
[9,26] Thyroid hormone is suggested as a first transcriptional regulator of the motor protein prestin and as a direct or indirect modulator of subcellular prestin distribution [27] and autonomous functioning of TR[alpha] and TR[beta] in cochlear hair cells modulates active cochlear mechanics and inner hair cell output activity.
Acoustic information carried by sound waves is transduced into electric signals by cochlear hair cells (HCs) and transmitted to spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and central auditory nuclei.
Since noise exposure has been known to damage cochlear hair cells, we next examined whether or not YMRE prevents noise-induced loss of hair cells in mice.
The clinical free radical scavenger, edaravone, protects cochlear hair cells from acoustic trauma.
Tubulin and microtubules in cochlear hair cells: comparative immunocytochemistry and ultrastructure.
Ricci said that this somewhat heretical finding suggests that at least some of the underlying molecular mechanisms for adaptation must be different in mammalian cochlear hair cells as compared to that of frog or turtle hair cells, where adaptation was first described.
Congenital deafness is most often caused by the lack of cochlear hair cells, resulting in hearing impairment that progresses during a puppy's early postnatal development.
There should be interesting research possibilities applying nanotechnology to some particularly challenging otolaryngologic problems, such as restoration of cochlear hair cells, regeneration of acoustic or vestibular nerve fibers, treatment of tinnitus, and treatment of anosmia, among others.