cochineal

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coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl'), [C.I. 75470]
The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain. See: carmine.
Synonym(s): coccinella, coccus (2)
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl)
[CI 75470] The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain.
See: carmine
Synonym(s): coccus (2) .
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The pigment comes from the Armenian cochineal insect which lives in the roots of a plant indigenous to the Aras River which forms a natural border between Turkey and Armenia.
Productivity of cochineal insects Dactylopius coccus (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) reared on cactus pear cladodes Opuntia ficus-indica (cactacea) produced under different fertilization conditions.
As far as cochineal red goes, it was extracted from the female cochineal insect that infests certain species of cactus.
(90) By 1807, the financially-strapped Madras Government terminated its one-pagoda-per-pound bounty for cochineal, although the Court of Directors' fund of 2,000 [pounds sterling] remained available to anyone who could introduce the "true" cochineal insect into India.
Having studied Armenian cochineal, from its earliest extraction in the 7th century BC to its use in manuscripts, or "miniature paintings", to document Armenian culture and life, Cavusoglu makes fantastic use of the pigment that comes from a carminic acid found in the Ararat or Armenian cochineal insect living in the roots of the Aeluropus littoralis plant.
Some sources claim that the Egyptians used carmine, an extract of the cochineal insect for this purpose.
A mother and her young daughter are washing bundles of alpaca wool in terracotta bowls and preparing dyes with odd-shaped vegetables and cochineal insects; around them, coils of pumpkin and lime-green wool hang like garlands and children with ruddy cheeks scamper at their feet.
Cochineal insects (Dactylopius coccus C.) from the city of Loja, Ecuador, were used here to form a new hybrid structure.
The gnarled trunk has been covered, almost beyond recognition, with wine-red powder made from the crushed bodies of cochineal insects, while white carnation petals have been sprinkled on the base of the construction.
Likewise, PSP anthocyanins have advantages over traditional synthetic red food colorings and the carmine reds extracted from cochineal insects. Those advantages include sustainability and ease of production.
To reach this objective, it is necessary to assure a better production by protecting this strategic culture from the most important pest, notably, diaspines cochineal insects which cause infestations often difficult to quantify on all North band of Algeria (Kosztarab, 1990).