coccygodynia


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coccygodynia

 [kok″sĭ-go-din´e-ah]
pain in the coccyx and neighboring region. Called also coccyalgia and coccydynia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

coc·cy·dyn·i·a

(kok'sē-din'ē-ă),
Pain in the coccygeal region.
[coccyx + G. ōdyne, pain]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coc·cy·go·dyn·ia

(kok'si-gō-din'ē-ă)
Pain in the coccygeal region.
Synonym(s): coccyalgia, coccydynia, coccyodynia.
[coccyx + G. odynē, pain]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kothari, "Neuromodulatory approaches to chronic pelvic pain and coccygodynia," Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplementum, no.
Thiele, "Coccygodynia: cause and treatment," Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, vol.
Coccygodynia and pain in the superior gluteal region and down the back of the thigh: Causation by tonic spasm of the levator ani, coccygeus and piriformis muscles and relief by massage of these muscles.
(24.) Thiele GH: Coccygodynia: cause and treatment.
There are many names for hypertonus diagnoses involving these symptoms including: levatores ani syndrome (Nicosia, 1985; Salvanti, 1987; Sohn, 1982), tension myalgia (Sinaki, 1977), proctalgia fugax (Swain, 1987), coccygodynia (Dittrich, 1951; Thiele, 1937; 1963; Waters, 1992), dyspareunia (Glatt, 1990), vaginismus (Hall, 1952), animus, vulvodynia (MacLean, 1995; Marinoff & Turner, 1992; Reid, 1993; Secor, 1992), vulvar vestibulitis (deJong, 1995; Spadt, 1995), interstitial cystitis, pudendal neuralgia (Turner, 1991), pelvic pain (Baker, 1993), and urethral syndrome (Steege, Metzger, & Levy 1998).
A consideration of the types and treatment of coccygodynia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 166, 437.
The application of infrared thermography in the assessment of patients with coccygodynia before and after manual therapy combined with diathermy.