coccidium


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Related to coccidium: Coccidia, Coccidiomorpha

coccidium

 [kok-sid´e-um] (pl. cocci´dia) (L.)
any member of the Coccidia; coccidian.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

coc·cid·i·um

, pl.

coc·cid·i·a

(kok-sid'ē-ŭm, -ē-ă),
Common name given to protozoan parasites (order Eucoccidiida) in which schizogony occurs within epithelial cells, generally in the intestine, but in some species in the bile ducts and kidney; the final product of sexual fusion and differentiation, the oocyst, which occurs within the host, generally passes to the soil in the feces, undergoes sporulation, and then acts as the infective form for another host. Coccidia are parasitic in most domestic and wild birds and mammals, occasionally in humans, and are highly host specific; most are nonpathogenic, but certain species rank among the most serious and economically important pathogens, causing coccidiosis in birds and mammals. See: Isospora, Cryptosporidium.
[Mod. L. dim. of G. kokkos, berry]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coccidium

(kŏk-sĭd′ē-əm)
n. pl. coccid·ia (-ē-ə)
Any of various parasitic apicomplexan protozoans that cause diseases such as toxoplasmosis in the digestive tract of vertebrates. Also called coccidian.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coc·cid·i·um

, pl. coccidia (kok-sid'ē-ŭm, -ă)
Common name given to protozoan parasites in which schizogony occurs within epithelial cells, generally in the intestine; parasitic in domestic and wild birds and mammals, and occasionally in humans; most are nonpathogenic.
See: Isospora
[Mod. L. dim. of G. kokkos, berry]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Marquardt, "The living, endogenous stages of the rat coccidium, Eimeria nieschulzi," Journal of Protozoology, vol.
Eimeria of sinaitae Kasim et Shawa 1988, a biliary coccidium (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Arabian toad-head agama Phrynocephalus arabicus Anderson, 1894 (Sauria: Agamidae) from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.
Suppression of peripheral eosinophilia by the coccidium. Eimeria nieschulzi (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), in experimentally infected rats.
Seeber's teacher, Wernicke, named the organism Coccidium seeberia after the protozoal subdivision Coccidia and his pupil, Guillermo Seeber (2).