coccidiosis


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coccidiosis

 [kok-sid″e-o´sis]
protozoal infection by coccidia. In humans it takes the form of Isospora belli in the stools; such infection is usually asymptomatic but occasionally causes a severe watery mucous diarrhea.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

coc·cid·i·o·sis

(kok-sid'ē-ō'sis),
Group name for diseases due to any species of coccidia; a common and serious protozoan disease of many species of domestic animals and birds and many wild animals kept in captivity; both intestinal and pulmonary coccidiosis have been reported in humans with AIDS.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coccidiosis

(kŏk-sĭd′ē-ō′sĭs)
n.
A parasitic disease of many animals, including cattle, swine, sheep, dogs, cats, and poultry, but rarely of humans, resulting from infestation of the digestive tract by coccidia.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coc·cid·i·o·sis

(kok-sid'ē-ō'sis)
Group name for diseases attributable to any species of coccidia; a common disease of many species of domestic animals and birds; both intestinal and pulmonary coccidiosis have been reported in patients with AIDS.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

coccidiosis

A tropical parasitic disease caused by the accidental eating the egg cysts of the PROTOZOON Isospora belli. It features fever, abdominal pain and watery diarrhoea and usually settles in a week or two.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

coccidiosis

a disease caused by SPOROZOAN parasites that occurs in rabbits and poultry.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Marsboom, "Efficacy of diclazuril in the prevention and cure of intestinal and hepatic coccidiosis in rabbits," Veterinary Parasitology, vol.
Natural dietary supplements may potentially be used as one of the novel approaches to treat coccidiosis due to their natural origin, wide dose range, and lack of grace period and stimulation of appetite among others (Chand et al., 2016; Khan et al., 2016; Alzawqari et al., 2016; Raza et al., 2016; Abudabos et al., 2017).
Arabinoxylans (AXs) derived from Triticum aestivum (wheat) were analysed for immunomodulation in broilers and its efficacy against coccidiosis and were administered with arabinoxylans.
Eimeria profilin has been considered as a potential vaccine candidate for controlling coccidiosis, malaria, and toxoplasmosis because of their capacity to polymerize actin for host invasion [21,30].
Albon (sulfadimethoxine, an antibacterial medication) or Tribrissen (a combination of trimethoprim, a powerful broad-spectrum antibacterial, and sulfadiazine, an antibiotic) are frequently prescribed for coccidiosis. Treatment is one to three weeks.
The overall prevalence of Eimeria infection in the present study was compatible with the 68.1% finding of coccidiosis in dairy calves in central Ethiopia [6], 67.4% in Kenya [11] and 70% in South Africa [12].
Therefore, the current study was planned to demonstrate the immunomodulatory effects of cereals, Triticum aestivum derived beta-glucans and the therapeutic potential against avian coccidiosis. In common, various in vivo and in vitro assays have been used to demonstrate the cell mediated and humoral responses in different animal models (Qureshi et al., 1986; Corrior, 1990; Qureshi and Miller, 1991).
LI., Vaccination of chickens with DNA vaccine expressing Eimeria tenella MZ5-7 against coccidiosis, Vet.
Failures to control coccidiosis in commercial broiler production may have various reasons, drug resistance being only one of them (Daugschies et al., 1998).
Until recently, coccidiosis outbreaks were mainly controlled by medicating feed with anticcocidial drugs, but the parasite's increasing resistance to drugs prompted the development of vaccines.
In case of coccidiosis, some medicinal foods and probiotics had been reported to provide protection against the infection by potentiating the specific immune responses, particularly the cellular and humoral, against Eimeria infection in chickens [33, 55].
The titles of their PhD research were 'Characterization of shisham (Dalbergia sissoo) against dieback disease in various ecological zones of Punjab,' 'Evaluation of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) bio-molecules as biological response modifiers and their immunotherapeutic effects against coccidiosis in chicken,' 'Occurrence, toxicity and prevention