cocarcinogen

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cocarcinogen

 [ko″kahr-sin´o-jen]
an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō-kar-sin'ō-jen'),
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cocarcinogen

(kō′kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kō-kär′sĭn-ə-jĕn′)
n.
A substance or factor that will not promote cancer by itself but can potentiate cancer when acting with carcinogenic agents.

co·car′cin·o·gen′ic (-sə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō'kahr-sin'ō-jen)
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Streckert et al., "Indication of cocarcinogenic potential of chronic UMTS-modulated radiofrequency exposure in an ethylnitrosourea mouse model," International Journal of Radiation Biology, vol.
(70,71) In brief, the cocarcinogenic experiments, both in mice and hamsters, showed that MM did not develop in animals exposed to subcarcinogenic doses of SV40, although a few hamsters developed lymphomas and sarcomas after a prolonged latency period.
The basis of the cocarcinogenic interaction of SV40 with asbestos has been studied further in an in vitro cell culture system using primary human mesothelial cell lines.
(73,74) The fundamentals of this process are schematically represented in the Figure, designed to depict potential "hit-and-run" cocarcinogenic association of SV40 with asbestos in mesothelial cell transformation.
In addition, there is some evidence that alcohol, even at low doses, increases serum estrogens under certain conditions and that this effect may be another important mechanism involved in alcohol's cocarcinogenic actions.
For bladder cancer, an excess risk was observed primarily among smokers exposed to As in the drinking water, supporting hypotheses that these levels of As are cocarcinogenic (Karagas et al.
These results support the theory that As can act through a cocarcinogenic mechanism of action, exacerbating the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of other compounds.
Over the past few decades, however, several animal studies have indicated that alcohol can have a cocarcinogenic, or cancer-promoting, effect.
Formaldehyde also showed cocarcinogenic effects by inhalation, ingestion, and dermal exposure (Dalbey 1982; Iverson 1986; Takahashi et al.
CAT in drinking water was not significantly cocarcinogenic with MNAN, but ethanol and CAT given in the drinking water was cocarcinogenic with MNAN and tumorigenic when given without MNAN (16).
In contrast to the data from Loscher's group, the Battelle studies found no evidence for a cocarcinogenic or tumor-promoting effect of MF exposure (12,13).
The marked difference in incidence of palpable tumors between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups 13 weeks after administration of 10 mg DMBA was reduced during further exposure (22), suggesting that the MF effect was due to a tumor growth-enhancing action rather than to a cocarcinogenic effect.