cocarcinogen

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cocarcinogen

 [ko″kahr-sin´o-jen]
an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō-kar-sin'ō-jen'),
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.

cocarcinogen

/co·car·cin·o·gen/ (ko″kahr-sin´o-jen) promoter (3).

cocarcinogen

(kō′kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kō-kär′sĭn-ə-jĕn′)
n.
A substance or factor that will not promote cancer by itself but can potentiate cancer when acting with carcinogenic agents.

co·car′cin·o·gen′ic (-sə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

cocarcinogen

[kōkär′sənəjən]
Etymology: L, cum, together with; Gk, karkinos, crab, genein, to produce
an agent that alone does not transform a normal cell into a cancerous state but in concert with another agent can effect the transformation.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō'kahr-sin'ō-jen)
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.

cocarcinogen

an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
70,71) In brief, the cocarcinogenic experiments, both in mice and hamsters, showed that MM did not develop in animals exposed to subcarcinogenic doses of SV40, although a few hamsters developed lymphomas and sarcomas after a prolonged latency period.
The basis of the cocarcinogenic interaction of SV40 with asbestos has been studied further in an in vitro cell culture system using primary human mesothelial cell lines.
73,74) The fundamentals of this process are schematically represented in the Figure, designed to depict potential "hit-and-run" cocarcinogenic association of SV40 with asbestos in mesothelial cell transformation.
In relation to the possible cocarcinogenic association between SV40 and asbestos, it is noteworthy that the peak exposure of the population in the Western world to asbestos appeared to have sharply coincided with the peak exposure to SV40 as a contaminant of polio vaccines.
For bladder cancer, an excess risk was observed primarily among smokers exposed to As in the drinking water, supporting hypotheses that these levels of As are cocarcinogenic (Karagas et al.
These results support the theory that As can act through a cocarcinogenic mechanism of action, exacerbating the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of other compounds.
CAT in drinking water was not significantly cocarcinogenic with MNAN, but ethanol and CAT given in the drinking water was cocarcinogenic with MNAN and tumorigenic when given without MNAN (16).
In contrast to the data from Loscher's group, the Battelle studies found no evidence for a cocarcinogenic or tumor-promoting effect of MF exposure (12,13).
The marked difference in incidence of palpable tumors between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups 13 weeks after administration of 10 mg DMBA was reduced during further exposure (22), suggesting that the MF effect was due to a tumor growth-enhancing action rather than to a cocarcinogenic effect.
Because of the high incidence of tumors in both cases, the sensitivity of these experiments to detect cocarcinogenic effects of MF exposure at the end of the study was low.