cocarcinogen


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Related to cocarcinogen: carcinogen

cocarcinogen

 [ko″kahr-sin´o-jen]
an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō-kar-sin'ō-jen'),
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cocarcinogen

(kō′kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kō-kär′sĭn-ə-jĕn′)
n.
A substance or factor that will not promote cancer by itself but can potentiate cancer when acting with carcinogenic agents.

co·car′cin·o·gen′ic (-sə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō'kahr-sin'ō-jen)
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, despite a variety of methodologic concerns, there is moderate to strong evidence to suggest that SV40 is a potential human cocarcinogen (see Table 2).
Crocidolite asbestos and SV40 are cocarcinogens in human mesothelial cells and in causing mesothelioma in hamsters.
Dietary catechol (CAT), a constituent of cigarette smoke, was previously found to be a cocarcinogen with methyl-N-nitrosamine for inducing esophageal tumors in rats.
Another possibility is that F[B.sub.1] acts in synergy with a cocarcinogen that forms part of the etiology of EC.
Ultraviolet and x-rays are cocarcinogens. Metastasis in these cases is very rare, if there is no history of radiation therapy.
Together with UVA, they are thought to be cocarcinogens for skin cancer.
The mechanism explained is that the anemia causes epithelial atrophy and decreases the repair capacity of the mucosa which allows the carcinogens and cocarcinogens to act aggressively, predisposing the entire oral cavity and esophageal area to malignancy [7,10].
This comes from the idea that at least in cervical carcinogenesis, HSV and HPV may act as cocarcinogens, with HSV as an initiator and HPV as a promoter.
Exposures associated with arsenic due to cooking and agricultural activities (including herbicide and pesticide use) should be explored, along with the identification and control of other carcinogenic compounds that may act as cocarcinogens. Such efforts could, in time, result in profound public health benefits and alleviate a great deal of suffering.