cobalamin

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cobalamin

 [ko-bal´ah-min]
a cobalt-containing complex common to all members of the vitamin B12 group; see also vitamin.

co·bal·a·min (Cbl),

(kō-bal'ă-min),
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.

cobalamin

/co·bal·a·min/ (ko-bal´ah-min) a compound comprising the substituted ring and nucleotide structure characteristic of vitamin B12, either one lacking a ligand at the 6 position of cobalt or any substituted derivative, including cyanocobalamin, particularly one with vitamin B12 activity.

cobalamin

(kō-băl′ə-mĭn) also

cobalamine

(-mēn′)

cobalamin

[kōbôl′əmin]
Etymology: Ger, kobold, mine goblin
a generic term for a chemical portion of the vitamin B12 molecule. See also cyanocobalamin.

co·bal·a·min

(kō-bal'ă-min)
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.

cobalamin,

n See vitamin B12.

co·bal·a·min

(kō-bal'ă-min)
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.

cobalamin,

cobalamin, cobalamine

a cobalt-containing complex common to all members of the vitamin B12 group.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jacobsen, "Glutathionylcobalamin as an intermediate in the formation of cobalamin coenzymes," Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol.
Cobalamin exists in two metabolically active forms, identified by alkali group attached to sixth coordinated position of cobalt atom: methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin.
Holotranscobalamin-a sensitive marker of cobalamin malabsorption.
Accuracy in measuring the quantity of each of the cobalamins in foods and supplements is crucial for understanding absorption mechanisms, which will lead to health recommendations important to the public.
Finally, adenosyl cobalamin is essential for the conversion of L-methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA.
Screening of the elderly asymptomatic population should be considered, as the initial signs and symptoms of cobalamin deficiency may be subtle.
On entering the stomach, protein-bound cobalamin is split by hydrochloric acid and forms a complex with R-binding protein.
Statistical associations between cobalamin and HC concentrations require no complicated theories.
HC is synthesized in many cells of the body, including leukocytes, and it binds between 80% and 94% of total Cobalamin in plasma (6).
In the commercial assay, the magnetic beads for capturing TC are the same, but cobalamins are determined by RIA.