cobalamin

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cobalamin

 [ko-bal´ah-min]
a cobalt-containing complex common to all members of the vitamin B12 group; see also vitamin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·bal·a·min (Cbl),

(kō-bal'ă-min),
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cobalamin

(kō-băl′ə-mĭn) also

cobalamine

(-mēn′)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·bal·a·min

(kō-bal'ă-min)
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

co·bal·a·min

(kō-bal'ă-min)
General term for compounds containing the dimethylbenzimidazolylcobamide nucleus of vitamin B12.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with inflammatory bowel conditions often suffer from cobalamin deficiency [1].
Pezacka, "Identification and characterization of two enzymes involved in the intracellular metabolism of cobalamin. Cyanocobalamin [beta]-ligand transferase and microsomal cob(III) alamin reductase," Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)--General Subjects, vol.
Cobalamin (Cbl), [4] or vitamin [B.sub.12], is a nutrient necessary for normal DNA synthesis, red blood cell production, and maintenance of the nervous system.
Nitric oxide interaction with cobalamins: biomedical and functional consequences.
Accuracy in measuring the quantity of each of the cobalamins in foods and supplements is crucial for understanding absorption mechanisms, which will lead to health recommendations important to the public.
Finally, adenosyl cobalamin is essential for the conversion of L-methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA.
Cobalamin is assimilated in the human body in a complex way.
Morkbak's claims that HC was "decreased" in cobalamin deficiency and that cobalamin deficiency may explain much HC deficiency are undercut by her data: most patients with low cobalamin (<200 pmol/L) actually had total HC concentrations well within the reference interval (>240 pmol/L).
HC is synthesized in many cells of the body, including leukocytes, and it binds between 80% and 94% of total Cobalamin in plasma (6).
Cobalamin (vitamin [B.sub.12]) is essential for 1-carbon metabolism and cell division.